Things To Know About Kyrgyzstan

K in Motion Travel Blog. Things to Know About Kyrgyzstan. Kyrgyz Landscapes.

Kyrgyzstan is a beautiful Central Asian country that was once a major feature of the trade routes of the Silk Road. It’s an adventure waiting to happen. Aside from its natural beauty, Kyrgyzstan is full of beautifully warm and friendly people that will try to help you in any way that they can. This list of things to know about Kyrgyzstan will help make your visit to the country even more memorable.

If you haven’t thought of visiting yet, you should put it on your list right now! Keep reading to learn some important things to know about Kyrgyzstan.

Things to Know About Kyrgyzstan – Language

Most people speak Kyrgyz, alongside Russian. Both languages have huge similarities. For example, the word for cafe in Russian is кафе and in Kyrgyz it is кафеси. Both languages use the Cyrillic alphabet. The Kyrgyz Cyrillic Alphabet has 3 unique characters not found in the 33 character Russian Cyrillic Alphabet.

While speaking Russian will get you through Kyrgyzstan with no problems, it’s also completely possible to travel the country relatively easily with no knowledge of Russian. You can find English speakers here and there, especially in cafes in Bishkek or Osh. There are also many Kyrgyz people using Couchsurfing, who speak English well and are eager to meet travellers.

If you can’t find a common language, you can always resort to hand gestures, body movements translation apps and using props. Kyrgyz people are a patient bunch, so they’re willing to spend time figuring out what you are trying to say.

Kyrgyz English speakers don’t have a strong ‘non-native’ accent when they talk, which means when they do speak English, they are very easy to understand.

I 💜 Signs

Every major city in Kyrgyzstan seems to have an ‘I Love’ sign. some even have 2. Locals love to hang out in front of these signs for crazy amounts of time taking selfies and ignoring everyone around them. Good times.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Things to Know About Kyrgyzstan. Kyrgyz I Love Bishkek Sign K in Motion Travel Blog. Things to Know About Kyrgyzstan. I Love Bishkek Sign K in Motion Travel Blog. Things to Know About Kyrgyzstan. I Love Osh Sign

Interesting Things to Know About Kyrgyzstan – It’s Okay to Hitchhike!

Hitchhiking is a completely safe and viable way to get around Kyrgyzstan. Kyrgyz people aren’t afraid of language barriers and will pick you up and chat with you regardless. You will of course, be asked the standard questions; “Are you a tourist?”, “Where are you from?”, etc. Once you answer, don’t be surprised if your new driver will tell you their life story.

Approachability

Kyrgyz people are friendly and approachable. If you ask someone in the street for help, they will most certainly assist you. Even if you don’t share a common language, they will find a way. They will likely stay with you until your problem is solved satisfactorily

Quirky Things to Know About Kyrgyzstan – 3 Som Coins

Perhaps the quirkiest cash denomination I’ve seen in all my travels is the 3 Som coin. It is worth approximately US$0.04. There are apparently no 5 Som coins. You will instead get one 3 Som coin and two 1 Som coins. Or if you get 10 Som change, it will be three 3 Som coins and a 1 Som coin.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Things to Know About Kyrgyzstan. 3 Som Coins

Handy Things to Know About Kyrgyzstan – The Water is Potable!

Don’t believe everything you read on the internet! Many sites claim that the domestic water supply in Kyrgyzstan is not safe to drink, but those sites are mistaken. Locals and tourists alike drink the water with no problems.

Don’t waste your money buying one-time use bottles of water. Save the environment and bring your own bottle to fill up from the tap. If you’re still a bit worried, you can simply boil your water before you drink it but that’s really not required.

Carnivals

One of the more quirky things to know about Kyrgyzstan is that people there enjoy carnival-like atmospheres. This can range from the hiring of motorised toy cars and selling of light-up souvenirs in a park, to permanent rides, carnival games and stalls set up in a reserve near a river. You gotta love people that just wanna have fun.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Things to Know About Kyrgyzstan. Carnival in Osh K in Motion Travel Blog. Things to Know About Kyrgyzstan. Carnival near Jayma Bazaar in Osh

Important Things to Kow About Kyrgyzstan – City Transport

Transport in Kyrgyz cities is cheap and efficient. Buses cover many major routes in the cities and out to the suburbs for 10 Som/US$0.15. They run at intervals of 5 minutes or less. Bus information for Bishkek can be found here

Taxis

Taxis around the city cost about 100 – 300 Som/US$1.40 – 4.30 depending on the distance travelled. Yandex taxis are also available in Kyrgyzstan and the cars actually have Yandex Taxi written on the side of them. You can use the Yandex Taxi Hailing app to order a taxi if you have data/WiFi access and a phone number that can receive messages in Kyrgyzstan. If you don’t have internet access, you can hail an unofficial taxi by standing on the side of the road. This should cost the same as an official taxi.

Mashrutkas

Mini-vans that work in a similar way to shared taxis, known as Masrutkas, are available for travel within the city, but the system is very hard to navigate unless you have a local with you, or you can read/speak Russian. There are many numbered Mashrutka routes that cost around 20 Som/$US0.30.

Intercity Transport

Mashrutkas are the main form of intercity transport. They operate out of bus stations in the cities and drop off on the side of the road in small towns. You can buy a spot in the van directly from the driver, although there does appear to be a ticket desk at the Western Bus Station. Mashrutkas leave when all their seats are filled. A Mashrutka from the Western Bus Station in Bishkek to the small town of Kadji-Sai near Issyk-Kul costs 300 Som/US$4.30 and takes around 3-4 hours.

Meat

If you’re a meat lover, Kyrgyzstan is the place for you! Meat is the main feature of most menus in the country, with popular dishes being Shishlyk (barbequed meat on skewers), kebabs and doners. The main meats used in these dishes are beef, lamb and chicken. Horse meat is also a popular dish in the area, given that other foods were often scarce in Kyrgyz nomadic history.

It might be hard to find vegan food in Kyrgyzstan, as even some salads have meat in them. unless you want to spend your whole time eating mushroom Shishlyk. Even salads in Kazakhstan can have meat, so it always pays to check what’s in the food you’re ordering!

Unusual Things to Know About Kygryzstan – People Love Drinking Horse Milk

Horse milk is a popular drink in Kyrgyzstan, probably owing to their nomadic history. These days, it is often sold from containers on the side of the road. There are different types of horse milk with different levels of sourness. Yes, you read that correctly. Different levels of sourness. It’s quite unlike any other milk you’ve ever tasted.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Things to Know About Kyrgyzstan. Horse Milk on the Silk Road

If you want a super local experience, you could stop at a yurt on the Silk Road and sit down for some horse milk and bread with a local family. Even if the horse milk is not to your taste, meeting locals is always nice!

Music

Whenever you go to a cafe or restaurant, you’re almost guaranteed to only hear 80s or 90s English language music. Normally the songs playing are remixed into more mellow versions of the originals. You can actually be listening to a song for a few minutes before realising that it’s a song you know. When you’re in a car however, locals are likely to not be listening to any music, so that that can chat with you. Or they play Kyrgyz music at a decent sound level and just talk loudly over it.

Bazaars

In the major Kyrgyz cities, when you ask a local what the must-see places are, the first thing they will suggest is the local bazaar. The bazaars are seen as the one-stop place for everything you could ever want and some things you didn’t know you wanted. The Osh Bazaar in Bishkek is huge and slightly confusing, but if you keep at it, you’ll find what you’re looking for.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Things to Know About Kyrgyzstan. Jayma Bazaar, Osh

The Jayma Bazaar in Osh is a little bit smaller and easy to navigate. I was able to find what I was looking for within 2 minutes.

On The Roads

While the majority of cars in Kyrgyzstan are left-hand drive, there are also a decent number of right-hand drive cars. Perhaps people drive the later for financial reasons, as they are much cheaper to buy than their left-hand drive counterparts.

Whether they’re on the left or right-hand side of the car, Kyrgyz driver can get pretty crazy. Lane markings are completely ignored at all times and overtaking on the most dangerous parts of bends on mountain roads is commonplace.

Pedestrians can’t escape the craziness either. While legally, cars should give way to pedestrians at traffic lights and designated pedestrian crossings, that’s not always what happens in practice. At traffic lights, turning cars will drive towards you, but will stop to let you cross. Although they may keep inching towards you slowly in a not-so-subtle attempt to get you to hurry up.

At pedestrian crossings, it’s anyone’s guess what cars will do. Most drive too fast to be able to stop for the crossing, while others do the right thing and stop. There is no simple way to cross a road in Kyrgyzstan and pedestrians need to constantly check for cars doing the wrong thing as they’re crossing.

You can read about my adventures in Kyrgyzstan here, here and here.

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Kyrgyzstan to Uzbekistan via the Dostyk Border Crossing

K in Motion Travel Blog. Kyrgyzstan to Uzbekistan via Dostyk Border Crossing. Welcome to Uzbekistan.

Getting from Osh in Kyrgyzstan to Uzbekistan

When I was trying to find out about the Dostyk border crossing from Kyrgyzstan to Uzbekistan, I ended up with a lot of conflicting and outdated information. If you go back a few years ago, it seems that this border was known for strictly adhering to rules and thoroughly searching everyone passing through it. They also had customs and immigration forms to fill out and you had to declare all foreign currency and medicines. These systems may have been in place because of tensions in the area at the time, but seeing as the situation is calm now, in 2019, things are quite different!

I started my journey to the Dostyk border crossing in Osh, which is part of the Kyrgyz Fergana Valley. Not to be confused with the Uzbek Fergana Valley on the other side of the border. I waited at a bus stop on the side of Lenin Street for the 138 Mashrutka to Dostyk. Inside the van, there was a board with the Cyrillic for Dostyk, ‘Достук’ written on it. The road was good until we were a little out of the city, then it was bad, then it was good again. The whole trip took about 20 minutes.

On the Kyrgyz Side of the Dostyk Border Crossing

The Mashrutka (minivan) dropped us off in a carpark that was about a 50 metre walk from the border. On the right-hand side of the road, there was a huge line of currency exchange shops. Most had the same rates but I found one that had a slightly lower rate than the rest. I exchanged my leftover Kyrgyz Som for Uzbek Som there.

Just after all the money changers were a couple of fenced-in lanes. Almost like cattle gates. They represented the start of the immigration area of the Dostyk Border Crossing. At the end of the lanes were gates where we had to wait for an officer. It felt a bit like we were cattle being herded. When an officer came and opened the gate, I was ushered to the left-hand side after he looked at the front of my passport, while everyone else was ushered to the right.

Border Oddities

I felt a bit self-conscious walking down an empty lane while the lane next to me, that was full of mostly women, was not moving. None of the people waiting seemed too worried about it though. I guess foreigners don’t go through that border often, so they were happy to let them through? My lane took me straight into the immigration building where there was a huge line of mainly men. I only spotted 3 other women.

When an old woman with a cane came into the room, everyone moved so she could go to the front of the line. That was nice of them. Then another 2 women with a brood of children ranging from toddlers to teenagers came in. All the men stepped aside for them too. As there were only 2 officers processing a huge amount of people and a lot of people jumping the line, I started thinking that I might be spending a very long time in that building.

Once I got closer to the desks, I noticed that the men were all going to the right-hand desk and letting the women and children that had passed us before go through the left-hand desk. The women were busy not paying attention, so I slipped in front of them and was out of the building 2 minutes later. It was great to finally be back out in the fresh air.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Kyrgyzstan to Uzbekistan via Dostyk Border Crossing. Uzbekistan Sunset

On the Uzbek Side of the Dostyk Border Crossing

On the Uzbek side, they also had the cattle gate thing happening. There was a tourist lane. As I was the only tourist, I went straight to the gate. An officer came and opened the gate as soon as he saw me walk up, then some local women snuck through the tourist lane after me. The officer was really nice and smiley and asked to see my passport. He told me to follow the path in front of me which went straight into the immigration building. The women that came through behind me were ushered into cattle lanes to the right.

In the building, I walked straight up to a processing desk. The guy on the other side wasn’t as smiley as the first guy, but still very nice. He stamped me in and handed back my passport with smile and said, “Goodbye and good luck”. Then came the customs check. I put my stuff the conveyor belt then picked it up at the other end. The officers were busy searching other people’s bag, so I started to walk outside. I then heard someone call out to me. Thinking I was going to get searched, I started walking back, but the man just said, “Hello, welcome”. I had successfully crossed from Kyrgyzstan to Uzbekistan with no dramas.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Kyrgyzstan to Uzbekistan via Dostyk Border Crossing. Uzbekistan Sunset from Taxi Station

Getting into Town From the Dostyk Border Crossing

I was expecting to be mobbed by drivers trying to get me in their taxis upon exiting the building, but that didn’t happen. A few guys approached me asking where I was going and then the negotiation started. I was heading to the town of Fergana, about 100km from the border. The first guy suggested 100,000 Som/US$11, so I replied with 30,000 Som/US$3.50. He then went to 35,000 Som/US$4, but I wouldn’t budge from 30,000. That guy gave up, but another nearby guy motioned that he would accept 30,000 and I should go with him.

I put my stuff in the car and he advised that we needed 3 more people. I thought this would take a while, but 5 minutes later, he told me to jump in the car and we were off. One of the guys in the back of the car said, “Welcome to Uzbekistan” and asked the usual questions. Then everyone was pretty silent for the rest of the trip.

The whole process of getting from Kyrgyzstan to Uzbekistan via the Dostyk border crossing took just over 30 minutes. I had arrived at the Kyrgyz side of the border, via Mashrutka, at 7pm. By 7:35pm I was happily on my way to my next adventure in the Fergana Valley of Uzbekistan. You can read about that adventure here.

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Silk Road to Southwestern Kyrgyzstan

K in Motion Travel Blog. Silk Road to Western Kyrgyzstan. View from the Silk Road

Hitchin’ A Ride Along the Silk Road to Southwestern Kyrgyzstan

My friend Argen in Bishkek had suggested that I should try hitchhiking in Kyrgyzstan. He told me it would be easy. As I was a foreigner, I would get picked up in no time. I’m always up for new experiences, so why not? What better place to try than the Silk Road to Southwestern Kyrgyzstan?

Kadji-Sai to Balykchy

It was only about a minute before the first car driving through the small town of Kadji-Sai stopped. The driver’s name was Asmut and his English was excellent. I have a knack for finding the English speakers in places where other people can’t, apparently. Asmut was probably the first decent driver I’d come across in Kyrgyzstan. He slowed down for towns, which I hadn’t seen any other drivers do. I found out he was on a business trip and lived in Bishkek. He took me to Balykchy, the town at end of the Lake Issyk-Kul.

I noticed a lot of stalls along the side of the road in Balykchy selling dried fish. I was told by a local in Kadji-Sai that there was no fishing allowed at the lake, so I really had to wonder where these fish came from!

K in Motion Travel Blog. Silk Road to Southwestern Kyrgyzstan. Dried Fish in Balykchy

My good luck with finding English speakers continued when I decided to check if a local service station in Balykchy had a toilet. It did! There was also WiFi and the staff spoke some basic English. It seemed like a good place to rest and refresh. As I walked out of the service station, I saw a huge Kyrgyz flag in the middle of an intersection and stopped to take a photo. It was then that my second ride stopped and asked if I needed a lift.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Silk Road to Southwestern Kyrgyzstan. Giant flag at Balykchy

Balykchy to Tokmok

In the car was a family of four and a grandmother. None of them spoke English, except the primary school-aged son, but he only really knew a few words. They took me to the town they lived in. It was called Tokmok and it was quite small. But there was plenty happening on the side of the road on the way.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Silk Road to Southwestern Kyrgyzstan. Scenery between Balykchy and Tokmok

There were a few cars stopped with flat tyres. Other cars had stopped to help them out! How nice of them. Locals apparently love to make word or picture formations on the sides of hills, out of stones. I’m not sure why, but someone had gone to the trouble of making the FedEx logo on a hill in the middle of nowhere. Everyone needs a hobby, I guess?

I also saw quite a few people with small barrel barbecues on the side of the road selling cooked corn. They waved their corn-grabbing tongs above their heads to get the attention of passing motorists.

One of the most interesting things I saw on the Silk Road to southwestern Kyrgyzstan was the unique domes of mosques in the area. In every other place that I’ve seen mosques, the roofs have been smooth domes. The domes in Eastern Kyrgyzstan have raised bits on them that almost make them look quilt-like. I actually think they look pretty cool!

K in Motion Travel Blog. Silk Road to Southwestern Kyrgyzstan. Quilt-like mosque Dome in Tokmok

When we got to Tokmok, the driver dropped his family off then said, “I’m taxi, give me money”. I said, “Take me to Bishkek”, then he said, “Haha, okay goodbye”. Cheeky git. As he’d dropped me in the middle of town, I had to walk a bit to get to the outskirts.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Silk Road to Southwestern Kyrgyzstan. Tokmok Town Sign K in Motion Travel Blog. Silk Road to Southwestern Kyrgyzstan. Tokmok Airplane

Tokmok to Bishkek

My next ride along the Silk Road to southwestern Kyrgyzstan came from Jazmek, a security guard at service station in Ivanovka. Ivanovka is actually only about 10 minutes from Tokmok. It started to get difficult to get a ride there. I don’t know if it was because I was getting closer to Bishkek, or because it was getting late.

While I was on the side of the road, a local boy called Hazhik came to my rescue and waved a car down for me. It was a relief to finally be on the road again. I soon noticed that the driver and the other woman in the car weren’t talking to each other. Furthermore, they had angry looking faces. Had I just interrupted a fight?

The woman actually spoke to me, via a translation app when the driver stopped to get some fuel. She was really nice, but as soon as the driver got back into the car, her angry face reappeared and she didn’t say another word all the way to Bishkek. So that was probably the most awkward things got on the Silk Road to southwestern Kyrgyzstan.

Silk Road to Southwestern Kyrgyzstan – Bishkek to Osh

Argen had told me that I would only have to go just outside the city centre in Bishkek to pick up a ride. So that’s what I did and it did not work out as I would’ve hoped. I figured that I needed to get further out of town, so I jumped in a Mashrutka (van) to a town called Kara-Balta at the intersection of the Osh-Bishkek Highway.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Silk Road to Southwestern Kyrgyzstan. Kara-Balta Town Sign K in Motion Travel Blog. Silk Road to Southwestern Kyrgyzstan. Kara-Balta Roundabout. Start of the Osh-Bishkek Highway

That did the trick and I was on the move along the Silk Road to southwestern Kyrgyzstan within minutes. The first car that picked me up was only going to a small town about 20 kilometres down the road. From there, I flagged down a van with a very excited driver motioning for me to get in.

My new friend, Ulan was eager to chat and knew a small amount of English. He gave me some курут or Kurut, a local hard, salty milk snack often eaten when taking long trips. He advised me that it goes well with beer.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Silk Road to Southwestern Kyrgyzstan. Kyrgyz Kurut
кыргыз курут – Kyrgyz Kurut

Waterfalls and Horse Milk on the Silk Road

After several hours on the road, I’d been drifting in and out of a sleep state, until Ulan stopped on the side of the road. He pointed to my right and encouraged me to get out of the car. I thought he meant for a stretch, but there was a cute little waterfall in front of me! The waterfall ran into the Kara-Balta River. The Pamir Highway (Silk Road) follows this river for several hundred kilometres.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Silk Road to Southwestern Kyrgyzstan. Roadside Waterfall into the Kara-Balta River K in Motion Travel Blog. Silk Road to Southwestern Kyrgyzstan. Roadside Stop - Kara-Balta River

When we were getting close to a yurt village, Ulan asked if I wanted to drink some horse milk. As it’s a popular drink in the region, who was I to refuse? I’ll try anything once! He stopped his van in front of a yurt and asked an old lady near it if she had horse milk. She did, so we went inside her yurt, where we sat down on the ground near a table in the middle.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Silk Road to Southwestern Kyrgyzstan. View from the Silk Road

Suusamyr to Pelmennaya

Unfortunately, Ulan had to drop me off not long after that. He wished me good luck on my travels and left me at Suusamyr. I’m not even sure if this place counts as a town, because I could only see one building. I guess it serves as more of an intersection for the road going to Osh and the road going to Talas, where Ulan was heading. Of course, there was a statue there.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Silk Road to Western Kyrgyzstan. Suusamyr

When I looked around me and saw almost nothing, a small thought that it might be difficult to get a ride crept into my head. It was chased away seconds later when a green truck stopped. The driver opened the passenger door for me and I saw that he had a mouth full of gold teeth. His name was Latim. He was also eager to chat with me, although he didn’t know any English at all. He showed me a photo of his granddaughter on his phone, then used the calculator on his phone to tell me his age.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Silk Road to Western Kyrgyzstan. View From the Truck
View From the Truck

Time for Dinner

It was slow going in the truck as the road is super windy. Plus there’s a lot of up and down because of the mountains. After several hours, we stopped at a place called Pelmennaya. It had the first non-yurt structure I’d seen in hundreds of kilometres. Latim told me to take a seat at one of the tables outside, while he went inside to organise our dinner.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Silk Road to Western Kyrgyzstan. Truck Stop at Pelmennaya

He came out maybe 10 minutes later with some other guys, who were going to have dinner with us. They told me their names, but I forgot almost instantly as I’d had a long and tiring day, that was still far from over. Another man named Andre came over to speak to Latim. I found out later that Andre lived in Jalal-Abad, about 100km from Osh. Latim had asked Andre if he could take me to Jalal-Abad, because he was worried that the truck was too slow. What a sweety!

K in Motion Travel Blog. Silk Road to Western Kyrgyzstan. Pelmennaya
Pelmennaya

I had definitely gotten the gist of what was going on but Andre called his daughter, who spoke English, just to make sure. Andre’s son Vlad was also travelling with him. Neither Andre or Vlad spoke more than a few words of English, but they were armed with a translation app.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Silk Road to Western Kyrgyzstan. Scenic lake on the way to Jalal-Abad
Sunset Scenery on the way to Jalal-Abad

Pelmannaya to Osh

It was almost dark by the time we got back on the road. Vlad was asking me many questions through the translation app. Perhaps the funniest moment was when he guessed that I was around his age when I’m clearly much older than him. I’ll take the compliment anyway.

We stopped at a place called Isabelle Cafe at about 1am for a food and toilet break. I’d fallen asleep during the ride, so I was surprised that we were still several hours away from Jalal-Abad. Osh was still another few hours from there. I’d originally thought I could make it to Osh by midnight, but now it was looking more like 4am.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Silk Road to Western Kyrgyzstan. Isabelle Cafe
Isabelle Cafe

We ended up getting to Jalal-Abad around 3am. You would think that there was very little chance of getting a ride at that time, but surprisingly, Mashrutkas were still running! Andre and Vlad found another guy that spoke a little English and was also going to Osh. They told him to look after me.

I finally arrived in Osh at 5am. It had taken more than 18 hours to get there from Bishkek. As you could imagine I was super tired, so I found myself a bed and got some much-needed rest.

Osh, The End of the Silk Road to Southwestern Kyrgyzstan

Osh is the second largest city in Kyrgyzstan, after Bishkek. It’s about 20 times smaller than Bishkek though, population wise. I think it’s main claims to fame are the river that runs through it and the mountain in the centre of it. You would be correct in assuming that I made my way to the top of that mountain.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Silk Road to Southwestern Kyrgyzstan. Osh. Sulayman-Too During the Day

Sulayman-Too (Сулайман-Тоо)

I decided to head up to Sulayman-Too, or Solomon’s Mountain at night. I’d figured it would be much cooler, as the daytime temperature was 35 degrees. My main reason for doing it at night was that I thought it would be much less busy. Boy, was I wrong! It seems to be a super popular spot at night too. I’m talking at about 9 or 10pm. It doesn’t get dark in Kyrgyzstan until after 8pm in the summer.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Silk Road to Western Kyrgyzstan. Osh. Sulayman-Too at Sunset

I spied the Ак-Буура Ak-Buura River on the way up. This river starts in the Alai Mountains and is 148km long. The first part I saw didn’t look too bad, but down near the city bazaar it looks pretty horrible. There are actually pipes spewing brown liquid into it. I’m not even going to speculate on what that liquid is and where it’s coming from.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Silk Road to Southwestern Kyrgyzstan. Osh. Ak-Buura River and Sulayman-Too K in Motion Travel Blog. Silk Road to Southwestern Kyrgyzstan. Osh. Ak-Buura River Near the Osh Bazaar

Back to the mountain, I found a shortcut up via a dirt trail. That dirt trail intersected with the stairs that the city had installed. The stairs were fairly irregular and the rocks underfoot in some areas had been coated with a strange shiny, slippery substance.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Silk Road to Southwestern Kyrgyzstan. Osh. Stairs on the way up to Sulayman-Too K in Motion Travel Blog. Silk Road to Southwestern Kyrgyzstan. Osh. Slippery Surface on the way up to Sulayman-Too

The Top of the Hill

Once I got to the top, I encountered a fairly sizeable crowd of people hanging out, taking selfies and such. I pretty much ignored them as realised that I had a 360 view of the city below. It had only taken 10 minutes to get to the top for the awesome view, so definitely worth it!

K in Motion Travel Blog. Silk Road to Western Kyrgyzstan. Osh. View From Sulayman-Too

There was a huge Kyrgyz flag at the top and the constant wind meant that the noise of the flag moving could be heard for quite a distance from the peak.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Silk Road to Western Kyrgyzstan. Osh. Kyrgyz Flag on Sulayman-Too

I noticed stairs going down on the other side of the mountain, so I went down that way. I found a cafe, then a park at the bottom. People in the park were hiring out motorised toy cars for kids to drive around. As I’d also seen that in Bishkek, I guess it’s a Kyrgyz thing?

Keep an eye out for the next installment of my adventures in Unbelievable Uzbekistan!

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