Can I Travel the South Pacific on a Budget?

The South Pacific region in Oceania, which encompasses Melanesia as well as parts of Micronesia and Polynesia, is renowned for pristine beaches, sparkling blue waters and island resorts. Resorts don’t exactly conjure up a picture that seems affordable to the average person, right? You may therefore be asking, can I travel the South Pacific on a budget?

The short answer is yes! In practice, it’s a little more complicated but it’s still very doable. You’ll just have to plan and research more than you would for somewhere like South East Asia. It’s not really a turn-up-and-go-for-it kind of region. This is due to a variety of factors, including limited transport options and the sheer distance between islands.

Imagine an area larger than the whole of the European continent, but with thousands of small islands randomly dotted around it. Then thousands of kilometres of deep water between them. The South Pacific is home to some of the most remote islands in the world. Despite the logistical difficulties it can still be done and it’s more than worth visiting! Let’s look at some commonly asked questions about travel in the South Pacific on a budget.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Travel the South Pacific on a Budget. Boats and Blue Water

I Can’t Afford a Resort! Where can I stay?

There are a surprising amount of choices for budget travellers in the South Pacific. It can get a bit trickier on the less frequented islands but all of the major islands have hostels. Most can be found on Agoda. If you can’t find any on Agoda or similar booking sites, you may need to ask Uncle Google and book directly with the property.

Obviously some islands are a bit pricer than other places in the world. Most still fall well within the budget category though. Expect to pay somewhere between US$10-20 for a bed in a dorm room on most islands. Or US$20-160 when there are no dorm beds available. Below is list of prices valid as of March 2020. Some of these prices have decreased in recent years as some islands have become more popular destinations.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Travel the South Pacific On A Budget

For the islands of Wallis and Futuna, Tokelau, Tuvalu and Nauru a little bit of research is required. As the third least visited and least visited countries in the world, Tuvalu and Nauru have limited choices for accommodation. There are only 2 places in Nauru! Due to that and the limited international flights serving them, these four islands could be the hardest in the world to travel on a budget.

Travel the South Pacific on a Budget – Couchsurfing

If you haven’t heard of Couchsurfing, you can check out my article about it here. In a nutshell, it’s a platform that allows you to get in contact with locals who are willing to open their home to you. It can be a bit hit and miss on some of the islands, because there are barely any hosts. But in places like Fiji and Tonga there are many hosts willing to take you in.

Couchsurfing isn’t just about getting a free bed. It’s about cultural exchange and giving you a window into local life. It can give you some of the best travel experiences you’ll ever have. Like sitting down to a traditional meal with your hosts. Or insider information on the quiet beaches and best islands to visit. There is also a facebook group based on a similar idea, but only for females called Host A Sister.

Travel the South Pacific on a Budget – Village Homestay

This could be the way to go in places like American Samoa and Tokelau (arranged through the Tokelau Liason Office). It’s a very similar concept to Couchsurfing, but is usually organised by a government department, who will vet hosts to make sure that guests have the best experience possible. As with Couchsurfing, it’s a great way to get a feel for local life.

Travel the South Pacific on a Budget – Volunteering

This could be an option if you intend to stay in each place you visit for several weeks. Sites like WWOOF and Workaway offer volunteer opportunities. For most jobs you are expected to work a certain amount of hours in exchange for food and board. Many engagements require you to stay for a minimum period of 2 weeks to a month.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Travel the South Pacific on a Budget. Beach Hammock

Isn’t it just all resorts?

No. The locals don’t live in resorts. They generally live in simple houses in residential areas. In many cases, they are happy to share their home and food with travellers. There are also volcanoes, hills that can be hiked, lagoons, atolls, reefs to be snorkeled, waterfalls to be seen. The list goes on!

Do I have to Fly Between Every Island?

No. You cannot fly between some countries in the South Pacific. For instance, if you want to get to the Cook Islands, the only place in the South Pacific you can fly there from is New Zealand. No other island chain has air links to that chain. The same goes for Niue. Tuvalu and Kiribati, on the other hand, can only be reached via biweekly flights from Fiji. There is only 1 weekly flight between Tonga and Samoa/American Samoa. If you want to get to any other island chain from either of these countries, you need to go via Fiji or New Zealand. Then Tokelau has no air links at all! You can see now why planning your trip could give you a headache!

When it is an option, flying is definitely the easiest way to go but it’s not cheap. Those biweekly flights from Fiji to Tuvalu are over US$500 for a round trip. The weekly flight from Tonga to Samoa/American Samoa is over US$300 for a one way trip of less than 2 hours. Auckland, New Zealand to the Cook Islands is around US$250 return.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Travel the South Pacific on a Budget. Weekly Flight From Tonga to Samoa
Weekly flight from Tonga to Samoa

If you have a bit of time, it’s also possible to buy yourself passage on any of the cargo ships that visit the islands. They have a small passenger allotment that is never full. This is of course much cheaper than flying but it will take time. A lot of time. You may also not be able to get to the exact island you want on the first try. It will definitely be an adventure though!

Inter-Island Transport

Most island chains have scheduled ferry services between other islands in the same chain. Frequency can vary wildly depending on the country though. Some like Fiji have very developed water transport systems to most islands. Ferries to many islands leave throughout the day. The more remote chains, like the Cook Islands don’t have any scheduled ferries. Locals normally have their own fishing boats for getting between the islands. So your options would be either fly or make friends with a boat owner.

Isn’t Food Expensive?

Yes and no. While it is true that most food is imported, there are still a lot of locally produced foods. A traditional meal at a local restaurant can turn out to be quite reasonable. Somewhere between US$4-25. Food at supermarkets can be expensive because it’s mostly imported. Tropical fruits grown on the islands seasonally will also be quite cheap. I honestly can’t think of anything better than eating bananas and coconuts everyday! Check in with locals and see what they’re eating. As most locals receive modest wages, eating like a local would be your best bet for keeping your expenses down.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Travel the South Pacific on a Budget. Coconut

Can I do It By Myself?

Yes! Absolutely! The Pacific islands are super safe and full of caring, helpful people. Don’t be surprised if people in cars stop to check if you need a lift somewhere when you’re walking along a road. It’s really easy to hitchhike on all islands. You could even end up doing it accidentally!

Public transport will also give you a chance to make some new friends. It’s almost impossible to take a bus in the South Pacific without someone wanting to get to know you. It’s also quite a cheap way of getting around, with local buses costing anywhere from US$0.45-2.50.

It’s also easy to hire bicycles and scooters on most islands. Bicycles are a great way to get around the smaller islands and range in price from US$8-25 for a 24 hour period. Scooters are great for the bigger islands and can be hired from US$10-35 for 24 hours.

If you really want someone to share the adventure with, you can check out social media groups to see if anyone else is travelling there at the same time you plan to. It can sometimes be invaluable having someone to share car rental costs with, to make sure you see all the waterfalls and volcanoes you may never get a chance to see again.

Why I should I Go?

Let me answer this one with pictures
K in Motion Travel Blog. Travel the South Pacific on a Budget. Cook Islands Calf K in Motion Travel Blog. Travel the South Pacific on a Budget. Tongan Coral K in Motion Travel Blog. Travel the South Pacific on a Budget. Samoan Calf K in Motion Travel Blog. Travel the South Pacific on a Budget. Cook Islands Beach K in Motion Travel Blog. Travel the South Pacific on a Budget. New Caledonia Sunset

How Do I Get There?

This will depend where you are in the world. The most accessible of all the South Pacific Island chains is Fiji. It has international flights arriving from every continent. It can also serve as a base for getting to other island chains. If you can’t get a flight to Fiji, then New Zealand would also be a great option, especially if you’re planning on going to Tokelau, Niue or the Cook Islands.

Get Yourself Into The Right Frame of Mind For Travel to the South Pacific on a Budget

I wish I could say it was easy but it’s going to take a lot of organising. Possibly months to get an itinerary that works logistically and financially. It definitely requires a lot more planning than places like Asia where you can just turn up. There are so many things to take into account, ranging from flight schedules to intermittent transport options. Once you’re there though, things will get easier as almost everyone speaks English and islanders will always want to help you. You know what? You got this!

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New Caledonia – A Piece of Europe in the South Pacific

After an awesome time on the Cook Islands followed by a short stopover in Auckland, I was on my way to the mysterious land of Noumea in the French territory of New Caledonia – a piece of Europe in the South Pacific

New Caledonia - A Piece Of Europe in the South Pacific. Aircalin Plane

When I boarded the small Aircalin plane bound for New Caledonia, or Nouvelle-CalΓ©donie, I knew this trip was going to be a little bit different. As Aircalin is the national carrier for New Caledonia, the onboard announcements were in French. I was glad to see that the plane wasn’t very full and I had a whole row to myself. It would’ve been great if the flight was longer than three hours, so I could’ve really enjoyed the extra space.

New Caledonia - A Piece Of Europe in the South Pacific. Empty Row

Once the sparkling waters we’d been flying over gave way to land, I became mesmerised by New Caledonia’s beauty. I was glad to see some hills on our approach to Noumea because that meant there would be opportunities to see some great views!

New Caledonia - A Piece Of Europe in the South Pacific. Approaching Noumea

New Caledonia was unlike any South Pacific island chain I’d seen so far. From the time I landed at the slick, new-looking La Tontouta International Airport, the place felt more like somewhere in Europe than a South Pacific island.

New Caledonia - A Piece Of Europe in the South Pacific. La Tontouta International Airport

Upon exiting the airport, I found the bus stop where I could catch a bus into the city. Or at least I thought I did. I couldn’t tell because everything was in French!

New Caledonia - A Piece Of Europe in the South Pacific. La Tontouta International Airport Bus Stop

Getting to Noumea in New Caledonia – A Piece of Europe in the South Pacific

I used the only phrase I know in French, ‘Parlez vous Anglais’, to check if the other lady at the bus stop spoke English. She didn’t. When the bus came, I tried to talk to the driver, but she also didn’t speak English either. Uh oh.

Luckily, another lady was approaching the bus who spoke a little English and was able to indicate to me that I was in fact in the right place and this was the correct bus. Phew! I paid the 400 CFP Franc (US$3.60) fare to the driver and got a small ticket in return. The ride into the city was long as the airport is 50 kilometers out of the city. That gave me some time to sit back an enjoy the view.

New Caledonia - A Piece Of Europe in the South Pacific. View on the Way to Noumea

The New Caledonian Capital of Noumea

The bus dropped us off at a station that was almost straight across from the waterfront. A military vessel was docked to the righthand side but it was too far away to read the writing on it. Sunset was fully underway by that point, so can you guess what I did? Took pictures for your viewing pleasure ;o)

New Caledonia - A Piece Of Europe in the South Pacific. Waterfront Sunset New Caledonia - A Piece Of Europe in the South Pacific. Sunset at the Waterfront

Looking back towards the town from the waterfront a casino could be seen. It may have been there for the use of the many cruise ship passengers that visit the place. Further on from that there were some decidedly European looking buildings. I was really starting to wonder if I was even in the South Pacific anymore! Aside from the crystal blue waters, there was nothing about this place that felt like a Pacific island.

New Caledonia - A Piece Of Europe in the South Pacific. Waterfront Casino

The level of development on New Caledonia was different to other South Pacific Islands. All of the colourful buildings and the roads looked shiny and new. I even noticed several buildings that were over 10 stories tall! That is a bit of an anomaly in the South Pacific where things tend to be low rise.

The roads were immaculate and set out in an easy to navigate grid system. This meant that I pretty much just needed to walk up one street to get from the waterfront to the top of the hill where my accomodation was.

Noumea At Christmas

When making my way to my accomodation I stumbled upon Noumea’s main park, the very tropically named Coconut Square.

New Caledonia - A Piece Of Europe in the South Pacific. Coconut Square Tree Lights

It was alive with lights, Christmas decorations and a 2 metre tall Santa. With a trusty snowman at his side.

New Caledonia - A Piece Of Europe in the South Pacific. Santa and Snowman

As if that wasn’t Christmasy enough, there were speakers throughout the park playing Christmas songs really loudly.

New Caledonia - A Piece Of Europe in the South Pacific. Coconut Square Light Tunnel

This was the kind of Christmas fanfare I would’ve expected leading up to Christmas, but it was several days after Christmas! So either nobody told Noumea that Christmas was over, or they just didn’t care. Needless to say, the atmosphere was very festive. Even the local Museum was lit up.

New Caledonia - A Piece Of Europe in the South Pacific. Museum at Night

Coconut Square By Day

When I ventured back to the square during the day, I came across a very deflated Santa. As well as a tent claiming to be the North Pole. Which of course seemed very apt for a tropical island where it’s was around 30Β°C.

New Caledonia - A Piece Of Europe in the South Pacific. Deflated Santa New Caledonia - A Piece Of Europe in the South Pacific. The North Pole Tent

The sheer amount of decorations in this park didn’t really hit me until I had a chance to see it during the day.

New Caledonia - A Piece Of Europe in the South Pacific. Coconut Square Christmas tree and Baubles

I can’t imagine how long it must’ve taken to make and place all these man-sized baubles throughout the park. It seemed like more of an art installation than just festive decorations.

New Caledonia - A Piece Of Europe in the South Pacific. Coconut Square Christmas Baubles and Statue

Street Art of New Caledonia – A Piece of Europe in the South Pacific

The park wasn’t the only place in Noumea that had a bit of art happening. There was a mural on the wall just before I entered my hostel. I figured it might be a one-off because I was staying in the area where all the cool kids were.

New Caledonia - A Piece Of Europe in the South Pacific. Mural in Noumea

But I did find a few other walls in the area that had been used as canvases. I’m not sure these would qualify as art though.

New Caledonia - A Piece Of Europe in the South Pacific. Graffiti on a Building New Caledonia - A Piece Of Europe in the South Pacific. Graffiti Wall

It was a little bit surprising to find a couple of other pieces of art around town. Like this.

New Caledonia - A Piece Of Europe in the South Pacific. Wall Art in Noumea

I even found this skeleton boat down near the port. I actually spent a crazy amount of time near this boat trying not to look dodgy while I searched for a geocache hidden there. At least one of those things was done successfully.

New Caledonia - A Piece Of Europe in the South Pacific. Skeleton Boat Near The Port

Down By The Water in New Caledonia – A Piece of Europe in the South Pacific

Although New Caledonia doesn’t receive a huge amount of tourists, most that do visit get there via cruise ship. Almost everyone I spoke to thought I’d come over on a cruise ship. They all seemed genuinely surprised when I advised them that I’d flown in.

As most people getting off cruise ships tend to hang out near the waterfront, there were a few restaurants near the port area. They were not the cheapest places to eat, but they were nice. And mostly closed. It seems island time had struck again! I walked along for a little while before I managed to find the only restaurant in a row of several that was open. That became my lunch destination.

New Caledonia - A Piece Of Europe in the South Pacific. Restaurant Near The Port

Ordering was interesting due to the language barrier, but we got through it with a lot of hand gestures. I ended up being served some raw meat that I had to put on a hot stone to cook. Is this some kind of Melanesian twist on a sizzling plate?

New Caledonia - A Piece Of Europe in the South Pacific. Sizzling Stone Near The Port

That was followed by a refreshing no waste desert, in the best flavour of all!

New Caledonia - A Piece Of Europe in the South Pacific. Choc Mint Icecream Near The Port

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The Captivating Cook Islands

What trip to the South Pacific would be complete without a visit to a remote island that tourists never really hear about? The often overlooked, tiny South Pacific nation of the Cook Islands had always been somewhere that I’d wanted to see. With under 30,000 visitors a year from outside Oceania, it’s one of the South Pacific’s best-kept secrets. The captivating Cook Islands are about as close to paradise as you can get on this earth.

Travelling to the Captivating Cook Islands

As amazing as the Cook Islands are, their remoteness makes them a bit of a challenge to get to. The only option to get there from Samoa, a mere 900km away, was to fly 3250km to Auckland. Nearly four times the distance! From there I had to fly another 3000km to Rarotonga, the biggest of the 15 islands of the Cook Islands Chain. That’s over 6 hours flying to get to islands that should only be an hour’s flight away.

Booking a flight from Auckland to Rarotonga requires a little more planning than normal. There are only 12 flights a week. Those flights are split between Air New Zealand, Virgin Australia and Jetstar. If you want to fly out of Auckland on a Monday, you’re outta luck. On Sunday, a morning flight with Air New Zealand is the only choice. But Tuesday to Friday you’ll have a choice of a morning or afternoon flight. Saturday is the busy day as all 3 airlines fly the route that day. There are also flights to Rarotonga from Sydney and Los Angeles, but they only run once a week.

To make matters even more complicated, flights to Rarotonga cross over the international date line. That means that most flights land in the Cook Islands the day before they left Auckland. Conversely, flights back to New Zealand land two days after they left Rarotonga. Are you confused yet? Things can get quite complicated so extra vigilance is required to make sure you don’t end up cutting your time on the Cook Islands short by mixing up your days.

Arriving in The Cook Islands

K in Motion Travel Blog. The Captivating Cook Islands. Kia Orana - Welcome to the Cook Islands K in Motion Travel Blog. The Captivating Cook Islands. Welcome Serenade

The displeasure of all that extra planning fades away as soon as you land in the Cooks. Who could help but be captivated by the cute little neon sign that welcomes you the islands? Immigration officers greet you with ‘Kia Orana’, the local way of saying hello, then quickly and painlessly process your entry into the tiny country. When you enter the baggage reclaim area, you notice a man in the middle of the luggage belt. He’s performing a slightly upgraded version of the serenade received on other South Pacific islands like Fiji and Tonga; with laptop accompaniment instead of guitars.

The Captivating Cook Islands At Night

On the way to the Cook Islands, I had crossed the international date line for the third time during my pacific adventure. That meant I had once again gone back in time, to land in Rarotonga on the eve of the day that had just passed. Of course, everything was closed and there were no transport options besides taxis and airport transfers. I’m not a taxi kind of person and hadn’t booked an airport transfer with my accommodation because I thought that NZ$15 was a bit extreme for a 5 minute drive!

My accommodation was just behind the airport, a mere 200 metres away from where I stood. Unfortunately, I had to walk all the way around the airport perimeter to get to it. That made the walk a little bit longer but also gave me time to really take in the awesomeness of my surroundings. I was awed by just how dark things got once I hit the suburban road that would take me to my lodging for the night. I must admit that I stopped many times to admire the amazing amount of stars in the night sky. It was actually an exhilarating feeling knowing that just a few minutes walk from an international airport had taken me far enough away from all light sources to see the full glory of the heavens after dark.

K in Motion Travel Blog. The Captivating Cook Islands at Night
Rarotonga at Night. Yes, it was actually that dark!

It’s Christmas Time Again!

After a good sleep, I woke up to Christmas Day, for the second time! The Cook Islands are a majority Christan country. So as you would expect, Christmas is a big deal there. With an island twist..

K in Motion Travel Blog. The Captivating Cook Islands. Meri Kiritimiti Sign
Merry Christmas – island style!

Most places on the island were closed for the Christmas holiday, so I’d decided to hire a bicycle from my hostel, (NZ$10 for 24 hours), and ride around the island. The island of Rarotonga, or Raro as it’s affectionately known locally, is only 32km in circumference. You can circumnavigate the island comfortably in less than four hours on a bike. Additionally, it’s an easy ride because the road around the island is completely flat. The middle of the island, on the other hand, is not so flat.

K in Motion Travel Blog. The Captivating Cook Islands. Centre of Rarotonga

Cycling Around The Captivating Cook Islands

The main road around Raro hugs the coastline, so you are guaranteed spectacular views no matter where you stop along the road.
K in Motion Travel Blog. The Captivating Cook Islands. Coastal Views in Rarotonga

Even the dead get great views!
K in Motion Travel Blog. The Captivating Cook Islands. Graves with Coastal Views in Rarotonga

Cycling around the island is a great way to get a feel for island life. You’ll also learn that islanders are not only a caring bunch, they also have a great sense of humour. The only ‘stop’ sign on the whole island is a shop sign!
K in Motion Travel Blog. The Captivating Cook Islands. Shop Stop in Rarotonga

And obviously this is a joke, right?
K in Motion Travel Blog. The Captivating Cook Islands. Rarotonga Humour

There are no busy roads in Raro! In fact, there’s a good chance you won’t see another person on the main road for hours. But you’ll see plenty of this.
K in Motion Travel Blog. The Captivating Cook Islands. More Coastal Views in Rarotonga

And this.
K in Motion Travel Blog. The Captivating Cook Islands. Rarotonga Coastal View

And maybe even a bit of this.
K in Motion Travel Blog. The Captivating Cook Islands. Rarotonga Rocky Coastal View

Seafood With a Side of Safety

After a few hours of cycling around the island, I had decided that it was time to escape the heat and grab a bite. Seeing as it was Christmas Day, my only option was to eat at a resort. I felt like I was the centre of attention when I walked in. All the staff were waiting to serve me. I was given the option of dining inside or outside. The decision was easy.
K in Motion Travel Blog. The Captivating Cook Islands. Resort Tables On The Beach

Owing to the season, the tables were looking quite festive, in that island kind of way.
K in Motion Travel Blog. The Captivating Cook Islands. Festive Table Setup

I’d opted to try a local dish called Ika Mata. It consists of raw fish marinated in lemon and coconut milk.
K in Motion Travel Blog. The Captivating Cook Islands. Traditional Seafood Dish Ika Mata

To be honest, I wasn’t holding high hopes for this dish as I’m not a huge fan of fish, but it was actually quite delicious. Once I’d finished my feed and admired the beach for a bit longer, I headed back to the main road where I saw this sign

Interestingly, the law on the Cook Islands when I was there only required people between the ages of 16 and 25 to wear helmets when cycling or riding scooters/motorbikes. I could probably guess why that was the particular age group chosen but it’s still a little weird that it wasn’t applied to everyone.

K in Motion Travel Blog. The Captivating Cook Islands. Rarotonga Coastal View Through Trees

After a few more roadside stops to look out into the mesmerising blue sea, I found my way to a small local shop where I’d planned to buy some refreshments. That should’ve just taken a few minutes, but I left the store three hours later.

Local Celebrities on the Captivating Cook Islands

You may be asking how I could’ve spent three hours in a small store. Well, part of the reason was that the lady behind the counter was a chatterbox. I also never shy away from a chat. Especially when it’s with a well known and respected local. Aunty Mei, who was the local lei maker, was happy to give me some insights into her life on the island.

Many are familiar with the Hawaiian lei, generally slipped onto the neck as a symbol of friendship when welcoming visitors. The idea is similar in the Cook Islands, but they also have many other uses. There are two main types, Lei Kaki, which are similar to Hawaiian leis, and Lei Katu which are wreaths placed on the head. Aunty Mei specialises in the second type. Locals will place orders with Aunty Mei for all kinds of events, like graduations and weddings.

Aunty Mei’s Leis

All flowers used for Aunty Mei’s creations come from her own lovingly tended garden. The impression I got was that Aunty Mei had enough lei orders to keep her going for several months at least. She did say she had noticed a slight downturn in business in recent years as the younger generation were becoming disinterested in traditions. That’s something that unfortunately seems to be a bit of a trend around the world.

Despite being busy making a lei at the time I had walked in, Aunty Mei stopped what she was doing to chat to me. That’s one of the things that make islands so endearing; everyone has time for everyone. It’s always enlightening talking to locals, but as it was getting late, I had to continue my ride. Aunty Mei said I was welcome to come back and chat any time, then offered some flowers from her garden as a parting gift.

The Cross Island Trail

After seeing the flat coastal parts of the island, I was ready to tackle the rugged, hilly interior.
K in Motion Travel Blog. The Captivating Cook Islands. Rarotonga's Interior

I had asked around town about the Rarotonga Cross Island Trail and most responses indicated that I shouldn’t try it without a guide. Looking at the hills I had to scale, I didn’t think it would be too difficult. Plus with my experience trekking around the world, I was sure I’d have no problems.

K in Motion Travel Blog. The Captivating Cook Islands. Rarotonga's Cross Island Walk

At the beginning, the trail was more like a road. Quite flat and easy to walk along. The surroundings were very lush and green as well.
K in Motion Travel Blog. The Captivating Cook Islands. Starting The Cross Island Walk

I even spotted a few animals just hanging around, trying to shade themselves from the harsh Cook Islands sun.
K in Motion Travel Blog. The Captivating Cook Islands. Mother Boar and Kids On The Cross Island Walk K in Motion Travel Blog. The Captivating Cook Islands. Cow and Chicken On The Cross Island Walk

The trail stayed relatively flat for a while, then it started narrowing gradually.
K in Motion Travel Blog. The Captivating Cook Islands. Narrowing Trail On The Cross Island Walk

The Challenge Begins

A little bit further along the trail, I entered the forest. It was there that the trail became considerably thinner and started looking a bit more like the trails I’m used to. I found this a little exciting as I was looking for more of a challenge.
K in Motion Travel Blog. The Captivating Cook Islands. Start Of The Forest Trail On The Cross Island Walk

Perhaps I should be careful what I wish for! It wasn’t long before things got decidedly harder.
K in Motion Travel Blog. The Captivating Cook Islands. The Trail Gets Difficult On The Cross Island Walk

Now I could see why everyone was suggesting that I do the trail with a guide. It was definitely not an easy hike. Even as an experienced hiker I was beginning to get annoyed with parts of the trail. It seemed to wind back on itself and cross streams a crazy amount of times. It was a relief when I finally made it to the mid-point of the hike.
K in Motion Travel Blog. The Captivating Cook Islands. Halfway Point Of The Cross Island Walk

From there you can take a side trip to The Needle, which is a rock jutting out from the hill. People think it looks like the eye of a needle. It can be seen from many places on the coast of the island.
K in Motion Travel Blog. The Captivating Cook Islands. The Needle On The Cross Island Walk

From the mid-point, the trail became slightly easier, although there was one particularly muddy section where locals had tied a rope to a tree to help people on their way down. I was excited when I saw this sign
K in Motion Travel Blog. The Captivating Cook Islands. The Last Sign On The Cross Island Walk

It meant that the trail was coming to an end and I would soon be able to reward myself with a cool-down at the Papua Waterfalls!
K in Motion Travel Blog. The Captivating Cook Islands. Papua Waterfalls At The End Of The Cross Island Walk

Getting Back to the Other Side of the Island

The Cross Island Trail had brought me out to the main road on the south side of the island, but I needed to be on the north side. Luckily there were buses that ran regularly along the main road. They run clockwise at certain times and anticlockwise at certain times. Unfortunately, I had looked at the normal schedule and thought they would run until 4pm. But as it was a public holiday, service stopped at 3pm. Whoops.

K in Motion Travel Blog. The Captivating Cook Islands. Palm Trees On The Walk Back to Town

I still had several hours before my flight departed, so I started walking. It wasn’t long before someone stopped to pick me up. He worked at the next resort, a few kilometres up the road. He told me he’d take me there and I could get another lift into the town from there. I actually didn’t mind walking, so once he dropped me off, I continued along the road.

Friendly Locals of the Captivating Cook Islands

I had probably only been walking for 10 minutes when another car stopped and motioned for me to get in. They were a middle-aged Australian couple who had made the Cook Islands their home many years ago. They told me they couldn’t imagine living anywhere else. The island life had won them over and I can definitely see why. A short while later, they dropped me off at the pub across the road from airport.

I had left my backpack there before I’d done the Cross Island Trail. As most places were closed by 4pm, I’d figured that it would be a good place to hang out before my 9pm flight back to Auckland. I sat myself down to enjoy a local beer with a view, when some locals came to join me.

K in Motion Travel Blog. The Captivating Cook Islands. Beer And Sunset At The Pub

They insisted that I shouldn’t be sitting alone and that I needed to drink more. Once I mentioned that I was flying out that night, they tried everything in their power to convince me to stay. “Don’t worry, you can get a flight out tomorrow”, they said. As amusing as my new friends were, I knew what I had to do. Get myself on that flight back to New Zealand so that I could continue my South Pacific adventure in the French territory of Nouvelle-CalΓ©donie.

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Surprising Samoa – An Undiscovered Gem in the South Pacific

I’d always known that time moves differently in the South Pacific, but I wasn’t aware that it was possible to lose a whole day! That’s exactly what happened in the hour between taking off from Pago Pago, American Samoa at 10:30am to landing in Apia, Samoa at 12pm the next day. Time gymnastics aside, Surprising Samoa is an undiscovered gem in the South Pacific, just waiting to be explored.

If you’ve read some of my other South Pacific posts about Tonga and American Samoa, you’d be aware that flights between island states in the region do not come cheap. The 45 minute flight from Pago Pago, American Samoa to Apia, Samoa was no exception, although at US$85, it may have been the cheapest in the area. We landed at the tiny Fagali’i airport, which only had a 600m long runway. As of 1st January 2020, this airport has been closed down and all of it’s flights have been redirected to the bigger Apia Faleolo Airport.

Super Small Airport in Surprising Samoa

The Fagali’i Airport was only a few kilometres from the town of Apia on Samoa’s second largest island, Upolu. All I needed to do was walk the short distance down the airport road to the main road to catch a local minibus for 2 Samoan Tala (WST)/US$0.75. As I was walking, a local guy started talking to me. This local guy, let’s call him Bruce, (not his actual name), was also going into town and said he’d help me find the bus.

It actually wasn’t that hard to find, it just required waiting at the intersection of the airport road with the main road. Bruce was saying that we may have a long wait but the minibus arrived soon after we reached the intersection. On the bus, the driver had a coin tray placed between his seat and the passenger seat, where all passengers were expected to place their fare. The driver would give change if needed but clearly preferred correct change.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Surprising Samoa. Seaside Bus Station

Interestingly, the driver was on the lefthand side of the car, even though we were driving on the lefthand side of the road. Samoa changed from driving on the righthand to the lefthand side of the road back in 2009. The main reason for this was the high price of continually importing American lefthand drive vehicles in a region where righthand drive cars were more readily available. Although the change happened over 10 years ago, it is still possible to see quite a few lefthand drive vehicles, like this old-style American school bus that is now used for public transport.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Surprising Samoa. American Style Bus

Surprising Samoa Seaside

The bus dropped us off at a seaside bus station right near the local market. Bruce suggested that I might want to walk along the waterfront for a while. It was rather peaceful. He pointed out some points of interest to me while we walked along. Of course, there were palm trees but Bruce couldn’t tell me if they were naturally occurring or introduced.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Surprising Samoa. Seaside View With Palm Trees K in Motion Travel Blog. Surprising Samoa. Seaside View

Bruce then said he would help me find the place I was staying at. The problem was that the building at the address I was given was not the place I was staying at. We stopped and asked at places along the way but no one had any idea where my accommodation was. I eventually found the main building for the flats quite accidentally. My host had left a key there for me. I was relieved to finally be on my way to where I was staying!

The Sleepy Capital of Surprising Samoa

With a population of less than 40,000, Apia is one of the smallest capital ‘cities’ around. I had arrived in the early afternoon, but by the time I got to my host’s place, everything was quiet. Super quiet. There were barely any cars on the road. All the shops were closed. By 3pm! Wow. That could’ve presented a problem because I was hungry at that point. Imagine the relief I felt when I spied a small cafe that had people inside. I happily went inside only to find out that the people inside were staff and they were closed. Feeling sad, I started walking back towards the door when a worker asked if I wanted to take any of the food they had left on the counter.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Surprising Samoa. Meat Salad

I was able to have quite a hearty meal with the cafe’s leftovers. Including this interesting take on a salad. That was great because I’d planned a hike to a nearby hill, Mount Vaea. I had no idea what would await me on the top of the hill that stood 472m above the town. I just wanted to get a good view.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Surprising Samoa. First Part of the Hike

Hiking To The Highest Point Of The Island

For the first part of the hike, I had to walk along some suburban roads to get to the trail. The initial part of the trail was more of a dirt road running behind some local farms. The road may have still been in use, but not that often. Except maybe by the occasional cow.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Surprising Samoa. Baby Cow on the Trail

About halfway up the hill, I met a local named Seb who was on his way down. He stopped to chat with me. He seemed surprised that I was on that trail, because it is the hardest way up to the hill. I thought it was weird that he would say that because I was finding it quite easy. I just shrugged it off thinking that other people’s ideas of difficult are different to mine. He was also worried about me going up by myself, so he decided to accompany me to the top. Even though he was already on his way down. I assured him that I’d be okay but he insisted. So now I had someone to talk to on the way up, which was lovely.

The Fun Way up Mount Vaea

We had actually come up to the hill next to Mount Vaea. I had noticed that on my map, but the second hill looked so close that I was sure I could find a way through the bush. Luckily Seb knew where the trail joining the hills was. That was where things got fun. Despite the trail being dry all the way up, this connecting trail was very slippery and muddy. Almost like there had been a recent downpour.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Surprising Samoa. Muddy Forest Trail

The previously open trail gave way to a well covered forest trail. That could explain why it was so wet even though there had been no rain. My trusty hiking shoes were having problems keeping me upright. But I was determined not to let the mud get the better of me! Although treacherous, the connecting trail was short. We were soon on the top of Mount Vaea.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Surprising Samoa. View From Mount Vaea

Tomb With A View

From the top of the hill there was a view over almost the whole town of Apia, although it was slightly obstructed by trees at few points. The first thing I had noticed when I got to the top was a huge white structure. Seb had informed me on the way up that this was the tomb of Robert Louis Stevenson. He had in fact thought that was the reason I was going up the hill.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Surprising Samoa. Robert Louis Stevensen's Tomb Sign on Mount Vaea K in Motion Travel Blog. Surprising Samoa. Robert Louis Stevensen's Tomb on Mount Vaea

If you don’t know of Robert Louis Stevenson, he was the 19th century author of Treasure Island and Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde. What’s his connection to Samoa? He settled in Apia a few years before he died. He was revered by Samoans and Seb told me that when he died, Samoans surrounded him with a watch-guard overnight then carried him to the top of Mount Vaea and buried him. The inscription on the tomb was from Mr Stevenson’s own words –

Under the wide and starry sky,
Dig the grave and let me lie.
Glad did I live and gladly die,
And I laid me down with a will.
This be the verse you grave for me:
Here he lies where he longed to be;
Home is the sailor, home from sea,
And the hunter home from the hill.

Heading Back to Town

Although there was an easier way down, it would take me several kilometers away from where I was staying. That’s one of the reasons I’d picked the trail I did on the way up. The start point was much closer to the area I was in. Seb had also parked his car on the road near the beginning of that trail, so we braved the muddy connecting trail again.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Surprising Samoa. Sunset Over The City

We got to see a lovely sunset over Apia on the way down. Seb then offered to drive me back to where I was staying. When Seb dropped me off, he suggested that after a shower, he could come back and take me for a drive around town.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Surprising Samoa. Sunset

Getting To Know Surprising Samoa

When Seb came back, we decided that it would be a good idea to eat something first. I thought all the shops had closed at 3pm, but there were a few restaurants that reopened for a few hours around dinner. I never would’ve known that without some local insight. It took a bit of time but Seb found a place that sold traditional local grub. Right next door to the local beer depository. Score!

K in Motion Travel Blog. Surprising Samoa. Local Food on a Car Boot K in Motion Travel Blog. Surprising Samoa. Local Beer on a Car Boot

We took our local food and beer to a nice little spot by the seaside before driving around the ‘city’. I hadn’t realised how small the city was until we drove around it. I had almost walked around all of it while trying to find my accommodation earlier in the day.

Seb decided that he wanted to drive me to the airport the next evening, so I told him the time I needed to leave and he agreed to be there at that time. Knowing that island time is a real thing, which causes people to be late a lot, I also made sure I had a backup plan!

The Sites of Surprising Samoa

The next day, I thought it was about time to see the city close up. It was lovely and quiet. My impression of surprising Samoa by that point was that it was kind of sleepy and slow-paced. That is to be expected on South Pacific islands. It could’ve also been possible that everyone was napping because it was so hot and there was nothing else to do.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Surprising Samoa. Town Centre K in Motion Travel Blog. Surprising Samoa. Town Centre Building Art

When walking around, I barely saw any people. But I did come across the striking Immaculate Conception Cathedral.
K in Motion Travel Blog. Surprising Samoa. Immaculate Conception Cathedral

Which was also beautiful on the inside.
K in Motion Travel Blog. Surprising Samoa. Immaculate Conception Cathedral Interior

My favourite sight in Apia was these amusing signs in the window of a pharmacy. Yes, an actual pharmacy in plain sight. Samoans have a great sense of humour!

K in Motion Travel Blog. Surprising Samoa. Town Centre Pharmacy Sign K in Motion Travel Blog. Surprising Samoa. Town Centre Pharmacy Sign 2

Rush To The Airport

Seb didn’t turn up at the prearranged time, so my host took me to a point about halfway to the Faleolo Airport on his scooter. There he helped me flag down a taxi. The taxi driver then agreed to take me to the airport for the exact amount of Samoan Tala that I had left. That was great, because what I had left was a little less than the 80WST/US$31 it would normally cost.

I was starting to get a little concerned that I might be running late. It was a 30 minute drive to the airport and my flight was scheduled to leave in 1 hour. The taxi driver however thought that was plenty of time. I was on an island, where being late was essentially being on time. There was nothing to worry about. I made it to the airport with plenty of time to spare. It was time to get ready for the next leg of my adventure in another South Pacific paradise; the Cook Islands.

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American Samoa: An Oddity in Oceania

Picture this; you exit the airport terminal on a lovely tropical island to get your international flight to another tropical island. Once you step foot on the tarmac, you realise that the only plane that can be seen is not even big enough for ten people. In fact, you can only see 4 windows! This is just the first of many things that make American Samoa an oddity in Oceania.

K in Motion Travel Blog. American Samoa: An Oddity in Oceania. Smallest International Flight Ever

American Samoa: An Oddity in Oceania – Smallest International Flight Ever

This tiny plane, the inside of which is about the size of a minivan, only runs once a week between Tonga and American Samoa. At US$374 for a flight that takes less than 2 hours, it was the exact opposite of cheap. But that’s not even the strangest part. On the way to the American Samoan capital of Pago Pago the plane made a scheduled stop in Samoa. Although they are in the same island chain, American Samoa and Samoa are separate states.

K in Motion Travel Blog. American Samoa: An Oddity in Oceania. Inside the Tiny Plane.

Upon landing in Samoa, all seven people in the plane were required to alight and pass through immigration. Just to get back on the plane again straight away. Our plane was so small that our pilot also doubled as the cabin crew. He didn’t even need a microphone to do the safety announcement. As you could guess, there was no cabin service, but everyone got a window seat. As the flight duration was too short to reach cruising altitude, we all had a pretty awesome view for the whole flight.

K in Motion Travel Blog. American Samoa: An Oddity in Oceania. View From the Plane

American Samoa: An Oddity in Oceania – Entrance Fee

As I was the first person from our plane to make it across the tarmac to the arrivals area, there was no line at the immigration window. To tell the truth, it didn’t even feel like immigration. The officer welcomed me in a cool and casual way. That’s not normally something you expect when going through immigration! He then looked at my passport and told me that I needed to pay an entry tax to visit American Samoa.

For a moment I thought that he might have been talking about the Electronic System Travel Authorisation (ESTA) used in the US. American Samoa is a US territory, after all. So I said, “Oh, I have ESTA”. He then informed me that even though it’s an US territory, ESTA is not required. American Samoa instead required visitors to obtain an entry permit if they are staying in the territory for more than one day.

Seeing as I had a flight out the next day, I thought I’d check if I would be exempt from the fee. The lovely officer asked what flight I was leaving on, without asking for any proof. He must’ve memorised the flight schedules. That wouldn’t be particularly hard considering that there are only 3 airlines running international flights from that airport. He then handed back my passport and said, “Okay, have a good time in American Samoa”

As of 2019, people from the countries that could previously get the entry permit on arrival must now apply online for the Entry Permit Wavier Program (EPWP). The country list is the same as that for the US Visa Waiver Program. The processing fee for the EPWP just happens to be the exact same price as the old entry tax.

America in the South Pacific

After exiting the small airport, it was immediately obvious that this was a little bit of America in the South Pacific. Everyone was driving ‘trucks’, which don’t exist on other Pacific islands. Anything that wasn’t a truck, was a minivan from one of the many resorts in Pago Pago, or an old-style US school bus. Who knows how they got transported all that way.

K in Motion Travel Blog. American Samoa: An Oddity in Oceania. Welcome to American Samoa K in Motion Travel Blog. American Samoa: An Oddity in Oceania. US Style Bus

Having visited the US on several occasions, Pago Pago really felt like it could be a small continental US town. The roads and infrastructure were almost identical to those I saw in the US. The island also had its fair share of American chains, like McDonalds as well as American style malls. All the people I spoke to had very strong American accents. Even they said they felt that they are a lot more Americanised that other South Pacific Islands. It’s actually something they are proud of.

The Beauty of American Samoa

Pago Pago, pronounced Pango Pango in Samoan is located on one of the two main American Samoan Islands, Tutuila. There is one major highway on Tutuila that runs from the airport in the southwest to the east of the island. The highway runs along the coast for almost it’s entire length, which makes for some mesmerising views on the way to your accommodation.

K in Motion Travel Blog. American Samoa: An Oddity in Oceania. The Flower Pot Rocks

The Flower Pot rocks are a prominent feature on the righthand side as you drive away from the airport. Just after them, you’ll see the Pago Pago Harbour, which is one of the deepest harbours in the world. The harbour is flanked on the opposite side by Mount Pioa, which is also known as Rainmaker Mountain. It is a big part of local folklore and is said to trap clouds, giving the harbour some of the highest amounts of rainfall in the area.

K in Motion Travel Blog. American Samoa: An Oddity in Oceania. Pioa Mountain

American Samoa: An Oddity in Oceania – American Traditions

While American Samoans have passed down a lot of their traditions and folklore through the generations, they have also whole-heartedly embraced American customs. I got to see this first hand because I was there around Christmas time. While Christmas is celebrated around the world, there are certain things that I’ve only seen in the US during the festive season. That includes people going out of their way to decorate their houses with colourful displays of lights.

K in Motion Travel Blog. American Samoa: An Oddity in Oceania. Colourful House Lights K in Motion Travel Blog. American Samoa: An Oddity in Oceania. House With Light Star

One final thing of note about American Samoa is that despite being in the same chain of islands as Samoa, it’s on the opposite side of the International Date Line. That means that it’s 25 hours, or more than a whole day behind it’s nearest neighbour. That definitely causes a few headaches when trying to book flights. In fact, when flying from Tonga or Samoa, you will land in American Samoa the day before you left. Then when it’s time to go, you’ll land two days after you left. That essentially means you’ll be flying back to the future!

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Tantalisingly Tropical Tonga

The South Pacific Ocean is known for its crystal blue waters and amazing marine life. It’s also known for pristine beaches on resort islands. But probably one of its best-kept secrets is the tantalisingly tropical Tonga island chain. If you haven’t heard of the Kingdom of Tonga before, it’s about time you did! The archipelago of 169 islands in Polynesia that form the Kingdom of Tonga lie to the northeast of New Zealand.

Logistics of Getting to Tantalisingly Tropical Tonga

To be honest, none of the South Pacific island countries are known for being easily accessible by sea. Unless you have your own boat. In fact, the most efficient way to move between them is to fly. Although quick, these flights do not come cheap, no matter when you book them. The flight from Nadi in Fiji, to Nuku’alofa, the capital of Tonga in the Tongatapu group of islands, took just over one hour but cost US$250.

The Fua’amotu international airport in Tongatapu is rather small. Interestingly, the runway is only graded to handle smaller jet aircraft, so you’ll never see a 747 there! Even though the airport is classed as international, don’t expect to be able to get a flight there from anywhere in the northern hemisphere. In fact, the only connections are to and from Suva and Nadi in Fiji, Pago Pago in American Samoa, Sydney in Australia or Auckland in New Zealand. Perhaps the strangest thing about this airport is that it closes on Sundays. Let’s just say it takes a bit of planning to get there.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Tantalisingly Tropical Tonga. International Airport

Arriving in Tongatapu

Once you’re there, you’ll be given a welcome serenade, as seems to be the island way. This had also happened in Fiji but somehow the Tongan welcome wagon was a bit lackluster. Or maybe they were just too cool. As you would expect from a small airport, immigration was quick and the officers were really friendly.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Tantalisingly Tropical Tonga. International Airport Welcome Serenade

The capital Nuku’alofa, is around 20 kilometers away from the airport but there was a slight problem. There was no public transport from the airport to the town. Taxis were, of course, available for 40 Tongan Pa’anga (TOP)/US$17.50. I had decided to do things a little differently. While researching for this trip, I had come across quite a few comments about hitchhiking being a viable way of getting around in Tonga.

A Hitchhiking Adventure in Tatilisingly Tropical Tonga

I’d barely even made it out of the airport grounds before a minivan stopped. This minivan was full of ladies who, almost in unison, motioned for me to get into the car. The ladies were very talkative and very interested in why I’d decided to go to Tonga. They seemed quite surprised that I would choose to go there. I got the impression that they believed Tongatapu was the most boring island in the Tongan chain and that there was nothing to do there.

After a while of chatting, the lady driving pulled over onto the side of the road. I wasn’t quite sure what was happening. Perhaps we were just waiting for someone? I couldn’t see any buildings around though. Just then, a lady seemed to appear out of nowhere and joined us in the car. It was at that point that the driver turned to me and asked if I had a license. I indicated that I did, then she opened her door and said, “I don’t like driving in town, so you can drive!”.

I was so surprised that I think I agreed before I really knew what was going on. But hey, I do like driving, so why not? The ladies directed me to their village, just outside of the town, where we had to drop someone off.

We stopped at a house where there seemed to be an impossible amount of people residing. At least 4 generations of people. They invited me in for dinner, but I had a host waiting for me in town, so I had to regretfully decline. My host Jasmin, who I’d meet from Couschsurfing, was infinitely amused that my hitchhiking adventure had turned in to a driving adventure. I guess that’s not an everyday occurrence.

Food in Tantalisingly Tropical Tonga

I was fairly hungry when I arrived and it was around dinner time. Luckily, Jasmin knew where the good local food was made. But what do you do when you’re waiting on a tropical island? Drink from a coconut, of course! A coconut straight from the fridge, no less.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Tantalisingly Tropical Tonga. Drinking Coconut

Cliche coconut consumption aside, I was looking forward to trying a local delicacy. A popular dish in the area consists of meat wrapped in taro leaves that have been soaked in coconut milk. There are two variations; Lu Pulu (beef) and Lu Sipi (lamb). I grabbed the Lu Sipi and it was super rich and delicious. Given all the meat and coconut milk it contained, it was also a very heavy meal. I was barely able to finish it!

K in Motion Travel Blog. Tantalisingly Tropical Tonga. Lu Sipi

Imported foods

Tongans also love having dessert after their super heavy meals and I was interested to see what Tongan desserts looked like. Unfortunately, pretty much everything was closed because I was on a small island after 7pm. I did manage to find an ice cream shop open though. It seemed to be the only place open besides a couple of bars. I’m not sure if that’s why it was so crowded, or if it was just because locals really love ice cream? Even if the only flavours available were vanilla, strawberry and blitz.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Tantalisingly Tropical Tonga. Super Scooper Ice Cream Shop

Another imported food that Tongans love is KFC. Tonga is too small for KFC to open there, but all Tongans know what it is. To the point where anywhere that sells any kind of fried chicken refers to it as Kentucky. Jasmin informed me that when locals fly back from New Zealand, where there are KFCs, they will bring back buckets of the stuff for the family.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Tantalisingly Tropical Tonga. Food Stall

Nightlife in Tantalisingly Tropical Tonga

When Jasmin was ready to retire for the night I decided to have a little walk around the town. Except for a few cars here and there, the town was very quiet. It wasn’t long until I’d found my way to some roadside tombs. They were quite ornate and it looked like people added flowers and tended to the graves every day.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Tantalisingly Tropical Tonga. Tombs

As I wasn’t far from the sea, I decided to take a walk down to the waterfront. That didn’t go as I had planned. I could barely walk a few hundred metres without a car stopping to ask if I needed a lift. Tongans are a very caring bunch and seemed worried that a foreigner was out walking by themselves at night. After the fifth car stopped and I hadn’t even managed to walk 500 metres, I gave up and found some local beer.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Tantalisingly Tropical Tonga. Local Beer

Animals of Tantalisingly Tropical Tonga

Of course, you would expect tropical islands in the South Pacific to be full of tropical animals like birds and colourful fish. I promise I’ll show you some of that later. Tonga also had its fair share of introduced animals wandering around. There were some stray cats and dogs, which you might expect to see almost anywhere in the world. But chickens weren’t really on the list of animals I’d expected to see. Never-the-less, they were everywhere and normally had a couple of chicks in tow.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Tantalisingly Tropical Tonga. Tongan Chickens

Other much larger animals that I was not expecting to see were boars. Obviously these had been introduced by European explorers and were eventually left to roam the islands. They generally seem quite docile and are always happy to eat any food you might leave out for them.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Tantalisingly Tropical Tonga. Tongan Boar

There are stories of fishing pigs. These are boars that have lost their natural fear of the water and can be seen wading out at low tide to catch themselves some dinner. If you were thinking of going to Tonga for some sun and sea, you could end up staying to watch the fishing pigs!

Wandering Around the Town

As I’d been unsuccessful in reaching the waterfront at night, I decided to try it during the day. This time I was able to do it in a respectable five minutes! That’s how small Nuku’alofa is! On my wander, I was able to see some palm trees as you would expect.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Tantalisingly Tropical Tonga. Palm Trees

But one of the more interesting things I saw was the Centennial Church. This church was run by the Free Church of Tonga, an organisation set up by the Tongan King and a missionary in 1885.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Tantalisingly Tropical Tonga. Centennial Church

Unfortunately, Cyclone Gita hit Tonga a few months after I left, causing widespread damage. The church was one of the buildings damaged and as a consequence, is no longer in use. The royal tombs across the road fared better though.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Tantalisingly Tropical Tonga. Royal Tombs

As I got closer to the waterfront, there were a few memorials around.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Tantalisingly Tropical Tonga. War Memorial K in Motion Travel Blog. Tantalisingly Tropical Tonga. Memorial Plaque K in Motion Travel Blog. Tantalisingly Tropical Tonga. Waterfront Memorial

And of course, as it was coming up to Christmas, some seasons greetings.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Tantalisingly Tropical Tonga. Seasons Greetings

I’d come for the water though. While there was no beach to be seen, the area was calm and peaceful.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Tantalisingly Tropical Tonga. Waterfront

Tourist Attractions in Tantalisingly Tropical Tonga

As the Tongan island chain is particularly remote and not the most easily accessible, tourism hasn’t had a big impact on the area. That means that literally every tourist attraction on Tongatapu is listed on this roadsign.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Tantalisingly Tropical Tonga. Road Sign in Nuku'alofa

That’s not to say that Nuku’alofa has not been set up with tourists in mind. There are actually a few informational signs around to guide you on your way. Like this handy map of the island, near the waterfront.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Tantalisingly Tropical Tonga. Tongatapu Map

Under The Sea

After Jasmin finished work, she asked if I wanted to join her for a swim. She had two bikes so we rode down to the waterfront. Given the absolute flatness of Nuku’alofa, the ride was rather quick and enjoyable.

We left the bikes up near the carpark and walked along some rocks to the local swimming spot.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Tantalisingly Tropical Tonga. Rocks on the Waterfront

I spied this little fella in a rock pool on the way.

But the view was definitely better under the water!

The fact that Tonga is a little bit off the tourist radar and a little bit harder to reach makes it all the more enticing. The absence of the big resorts seen on other islands gives it a more genuine and homely feel. It’s definitely a must-see!

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Friendliness and Festivities in Fiji

When most people think of Fiji, they think of islands, beaches and resorts. While these are certainly prevalent, they are not really what Fiji is all about. When I think of Fiji, I think of my childhood Fijian neighbour, who I thought was the funniest and friendliest man alive. Because of that man, I was expecting a lot of friendliness and a whole pile of laughs in Fiji. I was not disappointed! Read on to find out more about the friendliness and festivities in Fiji.

Fiji Time

Being a chain of hundreds of islands in an endless sea means that Fiji has a culture and vibe all of it’s own. Aside from the friendliness that was noticeable instantly, one thing that struck me on arrival was that everyone was happy. This could be because they have their own version of time over in Fiji. This concept may be a bit hard for busy people to get a handle on. I’m sure you’ve heard of island time, but Fiji takes it to a whole new level with ‘Fiji Time’. They even have the t-shirts to prove it.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Friends and Festivities in Fiji. Fiji Time Tshirt

Fiji time is really something else. Things move slower and no one is stressed by deadlines. This means that everyone always has time for others. Fiji has to be one of the friendliest and most welcoming places on earth. In fact, when you visit, you’ll leave with a new word in your vocabulary; Bula, the Fijian word for welcome. You will hear and see it everywhere!

K in Motion Travel Blog. Friendliness and Festivities in Fiji. Bula

All travellers arriving in Nadi are even given a welcome to Fiji serenade by locals in their colourful local threads. We may have had no idea what they were singing about, but it sounded cheery and quickly put us at ease.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Friends and Festivities in Fiji. Airport Serenade in Nadi

One interesting thing about Fiji is that alcohol is super expensive. Like really, stupidly expensive. So much so that when locals have friends flying in, they ask them to grab some duty-free booze for them from the airport. It’s half the price! I had therefore agreed to grab some bourbon for my host, Save, who in turn met me at the airport.

Friendliness and Festivities in Fiji – A Local Experience

Save lived in a very simple house in an area not too far from the airport. It was very green and lovely but I was disappointed to find that I was on the wrong side of the island to climb the mountains. The area only had a few small hills.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Friendliness and Festivities in Fiji. Far Away Mountains K in Motion Travel Blog. Friendliness and Festivities in Fiji. Little House on a Hill

As soon as we got to Save’s house, I met some of his family and we immediately sat down for dinner. As I mentioned before, Save’s place was rather simple, so they didn’t have a dining table. That meant that a rug spread across the floor became the dining table for a delicious local meal. Mostly eaten by hand. I like this idea actually. Who needs to wash those pesky knives and forks anyway?

K in Motion Travel Blog. Friendliness and Festivities in Fiji. Floor Dining Table

Save’s place was about a 10 minute walk down from the main part of town, where the buses to the city left from. On the way I saw some kids swimming in water that I wouldn’t think was good for them, but they seemed to be having a lot of fun! I also saw horses and chickens wandering around. It wasn’t until further into my South Pacific travels that I realised that chickens wandering around was a normal everyday occurrence on many Pacific Islands!

K in Motion Travel Blog. Friendliness and Festivities in Fiji. Horse and Water

I also passed a store that claimed to have all my needs. Although I found this claim dubious, especially considering the rather small size of it, I went inside to check it out anyway. It turns out that they didn’t have all my needs, but the lovely shopkeeper was eager to chat to me. With all that Fijian friendliness flying around, I didn’t leave that little store for over an hour.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Friendliness and Festivities in Fiji. Grog Shop

More Friendliness and Chats On a Fractured Fiji

On my many walks through the area that I was staying in, I noticed that there were a lot of Indian restaurants around. I’d also noticed Indian places of worship. I didn’t give it a second thought until the local bus into the city broke down. The bus driver invited me to sit in his bus and wait for the replacement bus to come. While waiting, he filled me in on why there was such a huge Indian population in the area.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Friendliness and Festivities in Fiji. Indian Temple

Under British colonisation in the early 1900s, Fiji was a part of the indentured labour scheme. Indentured labour is pretty much just a nice way of saying slavery. While the labourers did get paid, the wages were very low and the conditions could sometimes be atrocious. These indentured labourers had been brought over to Fiji from India at the expense of the colonial government. Yet the government decided that, even though these labourers had contributed greatly to building the colony’s economy, they would not pay for them to go back to India.

That left many displaced workers with little to no money and no way of getting back to their birthplace. With nowhere else to go, they made Fiji their home. While I’d like to say it was all smooth sailing from there, according to Mr Bus Driver, it was not. Even though they outnumbered the indigenous population at one point in history, they remained under-represented with in the country’s parliament for several years. They also endured many years of racism. It seems like things may be getting better if this sign is any indication.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Friendliness and Festivities in Fiji. Respect and Love All Fijians Sign

Friendliness in The City

As this impromptu history lesson ended, the replacement bus arrived. Mr Bus Driver made sure I was the first person to step onto the bus. He indicated that I should take the seat behind him. The 30 minute drive into the city cost only FJ$1.5, which is around AU$1. It wasn’t long after getting off the bus that a friendly local had stopped me to say, “Bula!”.

He introduced himself to me as Will and said that if I needed anything while I was in the city, I could go to him. After showing me where the cheap local food was, he insisted that I go to his friend’s shop. He had told me the story of his friend being a struggling artist just trying to sell some traditional handmade crafts. I was expecting a small shop, but it was huge.

While I suspect that story was a bit of a speil, Will didn’t get pushy. With their proximity to Australia and New Zealand, Fijians are no strangers to cashed-up tourists. So I can’t really blame the guy for trying. Even though I didn’t buy anything, he still seemed happy. When I left he asked me to tell all my friends about the store, of course!

Friendliness and Festivities in Fiji – Christmas and New Year

Given their colonial past, you would be correct in assuming that Fijians are big on celebrating Christmas and New Year. But of course, they do it with their own island twist!

K in Motion Travel Blog. Friendliness and Festivities in Fiji. Christmas Decorations

I don’t remember seeing many Christmas trees while exploring, but I did see many sets of lights arranged to look like Christmas trees.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Friendliness and Festivities in Fiji. House Christmas Tree K in Motion Travel Blog. Friendliness and Festivities in Fiji. LightChristmas Tree

When the new year is almost upon them, Fijians like the light up the sky with fireworks. As is done in many places. But what they do after is a little more unique.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Friendliness and Festivities in Fiji. Fireworks

As I was walking to a house party I’d been invited to by some people I’d just met outside a club, one of my new friends told me to stop. I was a little puzzled and wondered what was going on. My friend advised that there were people behind a gate getting ready to throw buckets of water at us. We quickly crossed to the other side of the road, where he explained that this is somewhat of a local tradition. Throwing buckets of water at unsuspecting people walking past. Considering it was summer, I could think of worse things to endure.

Friendliness and Festivities in Fiji – Islands

I guess no trip to Fiji is complete without seeing a few different islands, right? But what’s a budget traveller to do? Would you believe there is actually an island resort in Fiji that caters to budget travellers? It’s still not what I would consider cheap, but the price is considerably lower than other islands.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Friendliness and Festivities in Fiji. One of the Mamanuca Islands

Someone from the family that I stayed with for the second half of my stay, was able to get me an industry discount. That meant that I only paid FJ$190 (AU$125) for a day trip to Beachcomber, one of the Mamanuca Islands. The regular price at the moment is FJ$219 (AU$145).

K in Motion Travel Blog. Friendliness and Festivities in Fiji. Beachcomber Resort, Mamanuca Islands

A free bus transfer to Denaru Marina comes with the purchase of an island package. That was great because I really had no other option to get to the marina, which was several kilometres out of town.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Friendliness and Festivities in Fiji. Ferry From Danaru Marina

The boat ride out was quite enjoyable. As you could imagine, there was plenty of blue water to keep me mesmerised. Along with some famous islands.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Friendliness and Festivities in Fiji. Blue Waters At Resort Island

There were sporadic announcements about upcoming islands where different movies had been filmed. Some islands were even named after the movies that were filmed there.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Friendliness and Festivities in Fiji. Resort Island, Mamanuca Islands

We even stopped at a few of the bigger resort islands on the way to drop off passengers. They got their own special island welcome.

Friendliness and Festivities in Fiji – Beachcomber

Beachcomber itself is clearly set up for a younger, more active crowd.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Friendliness and Festivities in Fiji. Entrance to Beachcomber

Even though the whole island is less than one kilometre long, there’s a lot to do, if you’re willing to pay a bit extra of course. You could play mini golf on a fairly well-used course. Or do some kayaking. Although that option wasn’t available on the day I was there.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Friendliness and Festivities in Fiji. Beachcomber Minigolf

The first thing you might notice is The Sand Bar, where you can get yourself a local beverage for about FJ$8.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Friendliness and Festivities in Fiji. The Sand Bar at Beachcomber K in Motion Travel Blog. Friendliness and Festivities in Fiji. Fiji Beer at Beach Bar at Beachcomber

But if you take 10 minutes to have a walk around the island, you might see some wildlife too.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Friendliness and Festivities in Fiji. Beachcomber Duck

Or there’s a small boat tour included in your day trip. They’ll take you out to the middle of the sea to let you do some snorkeling and feed some fish.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Friendliness and Festivities in Fiji. Fish Near Beachcomber K in Motion Travel Blog. Friendliness and Festivities in Fiji. Fish Feeding Near Beachcomber

Perhaps you’d just prefer to sit on the beach and admire the view?

K in Motion Travel Blog. Friendliness and Festivities in Fiji. Beachcomber Beach View

Keep an eye out for the next stop on my South Pacific tour; Tonga!

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Spirits and Storms on the Solomon Islands

The Solomon Islands is a small Melanesian state about 3000km northeast of Australia in the Pacific Ocean. The country is probably most famous for its main island’s pivotal role in World War II, as well as shipwreck diving. I wasn’t there for the diving though. I was about to gain some knowledge about surly spirits and storms on the Solomon Islands.

Where’s the WiFi?

Upon landing in the capital Honiara on a flight from Papua New Guinea, I had hoped to find some WiFi to reinitialise my phone after it had been wiped in Port Moresby. Unfortunately, there was no WiFi to be found so I figured I’d have to try my luck in town.

I was informed that I could catch a bus from the road outside the airport. What I realised when I got out to the road, was that there was no bus stop. The opposite side of the road was lined with many small stalls, selling various items. As I was about to cross the road to ask a seller about the bus, I noticed a group of people standing around like they were waiting for something. I joined the crowd and someone started chatting with me. The bus, which was actually a minivan, pulled up a short while later.

A young boy on board who collected fares from everyone. It was only 5 Solomon Island dollars, SB$5, which is roughly AU$0.90. Bargain! As an added bonus, the value of the currency was almost on par with my home currency, so I didn’t have to waste time calculating! Someone on the bus had suggested that I could get WiFi at the Tourist Centre in town, so that’s where I got dropped off.

Tourist Centre

Upon entering, I was greeted by a lovely gentleman named Nelson. I explained my predicament and need for internet to reinitialise my phone. He said I could stay and use the WiFi until the centre closed. How wonderful! Internet on the Solomon Islands is slow. It was 2 hours before I realised that closing time had come and gone. Nelson was working late and had decided to leave me to it for a while.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Spirits and Storms on the Solomon Islands
By the time I got outside..

Luckily I had almost everything I needed for the phone to function reinstalled by the time he was done. He then made some calls to find me the cheapest hotel, using his industry discount. His kindness didn’t stop there either. As the hotel wasn’t too far from the centre, he graciously offered to walk me over. Not only are the Solomon Islands lusciously green, but the people are pretty awesome too!

Spirits and Storms on the Solomon Islands – Walking Around Town

I realised after checking into my room that I hadn’t eaten for a while, so it was time to go hunting! It took me an hour to find food. Not because I got lost, but because almost everyone wanted to chat with me. After dinner, as I was trying to cross the road, a man named Manu started talking to me. He offered to walk me back to my hotel. Seems like that’s a thing in Honiara!

Manu then decided to stay and have a chat in the hotel bar. He inquired about my plans in Honiara, so of course, I told him that I wanted to go to the Tenaru Falls! I realised I was pretty tired by that point and as we parted ways, Manu said that he would get his friend to drive me to the waterfalls the next day. At this point, I was wondering if the whole town had received a memo telling them to look after me.

Spirits and Storms on the Solomon Islands – Adventures Beyond Honiara

Just as he said they would, Manu and his friends arrived to pick me up at around 8:30am. The drive was long, mainly because the road was terrible. It was still passable without a 4WD though. It seems Manu’s friend, Joei, was a taxi driver. I later found out that he’d had taken the day off work to use his taxi to drive me around. Wow.

I presumed the other person in the car, Joylee, was Joei’s friend. She told me later that she had never met Joei before. It turns out that he had picked her up on the way because he felt bad that I was going to be the only female in the car. Not that it’s something that would worry me, but it’s a nice thought, I guess.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Spirits and Storms on the Solomon Islands. On the Way to Tenaru Falls
On the Way to Tenaru Falls
Surly Spirits and a Man of Mystery

We passed a gate that a local came out to open for us. Then a mysterious old man approached us and said that he could take us to the falls. As no one else in the car was exactly sure how to get to the falls, we indicated for him to get in the car. He directed us to the start point of the trail, which didn’t really look like much of a trail at all.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Spirits and Storms on the Solomon Islands. On the way to Tenaru Falls
Tenaru River

We followed this man for about 20 minutes, by which time I’d started to get the feeling that he didn’t really know where he was going. He had us zig-zagging across a small river. It was at this point that he mumbled something about bad spirits and disappeared into the forest. We decided our best course of action was to head back to the car and try to find another way to the falls.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Spirits and Storms on the Solomon Islands. Old Man Guiding Us to Tenaru Falls
Old man guiding us to the Tenaru Falls

We drove to Paringiju Lodge, which is run by Manu’s cousin Freida and her husband. By the time we got there, Joylee was passed out in the back of the car from drinking too much. So we left her there and went into the lodge. Freida gave us some cold water and offered to take me to the falls. She knew a more direct path.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Spirits and Storms on the Solomon Islands. Trail to Tenaru Falls

Tenaru Falls – Take Two

I followed Freida down a trail which started off nicely enough. Until it started getting exponentially more difficult. This was partly because it got steep and partly because it was muddy and slippery. I was struggling with hiking shoes, but Freida, who’d left her flip flops at the beginning of the trail, was just flying along with bare feet. My feet slid out from underneath me on a few occasions, but I managed to grab hold of nearby trees before I ended up on the ground. Unfortunately, there were no trees around on my last slip and I landed flat on my back. I limped back, but I was glad that I’d somehow avoided getting a muddy butt in the process.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Spirits and Storms on the Solomon Islands. View From The Lodg

To add insult to injury, my camera had decided to be temperamental while on the trail, so I wasn’t even able to take any pictures of the view I’d worked so hard to see. Back at the lodge, everyone except Joei seemed to have drunk themselves into oblivion. This made it a mission to get them to the car. We were finally loaded and ready to go about 30 minutes later.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Spirits and Storms on the Solomon Islands. Back to Honiara
Palm trees rushing past on the way back to Honiara

I was a bit worried that Joei had been drinking while I was hiking, but his car was my only option for getting back to civilisation. He drove a little faster on the way down than he had on the way up, but then he drove like a maniac once we hit the sealed road again. All I could do was hope to get back to town in one piece.

Spirits and Storms on the Solomon Islands – Back In Honiara

Manu said that he’d organised a hotel room for me for free through his company. I was surprised, as I had not asked for that. I had made it clear that I was capable of getting my own room and I would not be ‘trading’ anything for it. He was still very insistent that I take it. Later, after we’d eaten, he professed his love for me. It may have been the alcohol he’d imbibed talking, but it was getting a little too awkward for me. So I swapped to another room.

Earlier that day, I had arranged to meet Nelson, the man from the Tourist Centre. Being the kind man that he is, he had offered to drive me around to show me some of the town. It really helps to get to know a place when the person driving you around works at the tourist centre! I’m sure I now know more about Honiara than most of the locals do. What a nice way to end a day.

Discovering Honiara’s Past

After all that had happened, I’d decided that I was just going to walk around by myself for a bit. The island of Guadalcanal had played a huge part in World War II, so of course there is a huge memorial in Honiara. It also happens to be on top of a hill and I do love walking up hills.

K in Motion Travel Blog, Spirits and Storms on the Solomon Islands. Peace Park Memorial K in Motion Travel Blog, Spirits and Storms on the Solomon Islands. Peace Park Memorial Name Plaque

Passionate Caretaker for the Solomon Islands Peace Park Memorial

The place was kept in perfect condition by the caretaker. He invited me into his little booth when I got stuck in the very open memorial area as a huge storm came in. Once I was inside, he told me that the storm would take a while to pass. I think it was actually over an hour. It seemed like only 10 minutes because of the great company.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Spirits and Storms on the Solomon Islands. Storm Over Honiara
Storm over Honiara

He told me that he has been the caretaker there for over 20 years. In that time, he’d tended to the gardens and kept them looking beautiful and fresh. He’d also made sure that the grounds were always clean. Clearly he’s done a great job, because the place was immaculate. He’s done this for years because he believes that the people that lost their lives in the war deserve it. What a lovely man.

Once the storm finally passed, I headed back out onto the road to continue my walk. I ended up finding the Mataniku River, which essentially separates the city into 2 areas. The only access point between the two was a not-so-stable looking bridge. I can’t say it was the prettiest river I’d ever seen. In fact, there seemed to be a lot of rubbish in an around it. The part of the Tenaru River I’d seen a few days earlier was much nicer.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Spirits and Storms on the Solomon Islands. Mataniku River
Mataniku River

Time For a SolBrew After Spirits and Storms on the Solomon Islands

After all my adventures, I’d figured a quiet drink or two was in order. My first mistake was thinking that would be possible in Honiara! It seemed that everywhere I went, locals were insistent on buying me drinks. I mean, they would ask if they could buy me a drink, but the drink would be in front of me before I finished answering. The good thing was that the happily tipsy men and women in the pub were happy to tell me their fascinating stories about life on the islands.

I ended up back at the Tourist Centre later, where I met and chatted with Nelson and more of the crew that works there. One of them, I’m ashamed at this point that I can’t remember his name, told me that I must join them at the yacht club later. Who was I to refuse? I made my way there a little after the agreed time, because I was on island time. When I first arrived, I couldn’t find any of crew. A well-known local was worried that I had no one to talk to and insisted that I sit with him and his friends. I must’ve been talking to them for hours before I finally met the people that I’d originally gone there to meet!

We might’ve stayed there until near closing time, although I have no idea when that was. No one was ready to call it a night, so we all sat around chatting at the Tourist Centre. Clearly I got very little sleep, but it was probably the best way to spend my last night in the Solomon islands.

πŸ‡ΈπŸ‡§Solomon Islands SummaryπŸ‡ΈπŸ‡§

In a few words – beautiful people
Language – English and Solomon Pijin
Currency – Solomon Island Dollar (SBD)
WiFi availability – πŸ“ΆπŸ“ΆπŸ“ΆπŸ“Ά
Wifi was available at hotels and some cafes, but the cafes had very short opening hours. It wasn’t the fastest, but probably better than some places
Transport – πŸš—πŸš—πŸš—πŸš—
🚐 Buses, or more accurately, minivans run regularly around town and cost SB$3 to go anywhere in town and about SB$8 to and from the airport
🚘 Taxis are available from the airport to the town for around SB$100
Roads – πŸ›£πŸ›£πŸ›£
Main roads were mostly smooth and sealed, except for several kilometres where roadworks were taking place. Roads in more remote places weren’t sealed, but still drivable without a 4WD
Scenery – πŸŒ³β›°πŸžπŸ–πŸŒ³
The Solomons have a diverse range of scenery, with mountains, waterfalls, rivers, forests and beaches
Prices – πŸ’°πŸ’°πŸ’°
As seems to be the case in a few places where tourism isn’t a huge industry, accommodation is quite expensive. Everything else in the Solomons is quite cheap though
Border efficiency – πŸ›ƒπŸ›ƒπŸ›ƒπŸ›ƒ
The international airport is tiny, which means entering and exiting can be pretty quick. There’s almost no chance of another plane arriving/departing at the same time as yours!
Overall – πŸ‘πŸ‘πŸ‘πŸ‘πŸ‘

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Petty Theft and Pragmatism in Papua New Guinea

Papua New Guinea (Papua Niugini) isn’t a place you see on many people’s travel itineraries. You could say the country has had a troubled history. It was governed by Australia until 1975 and is still trying to find its feet as an independent realm in the Commonwealth of Nations. This makes it a mix of contradictions. I encountered both petty theft and pragmatism in Papua New Guinea. It can be a frustrating place for travellers, but I’d say the helpfulness of people there is enough of a reason to visit.

Upon arrival at the airport, I joined the long line for immigration clearance. That gave me time and to contemplate if my documentation in order. The immigration officer processing my entry was very friendly and wished me well. After that, I had to clear the customs area. I thought that would be a hassle, but the man at the desk just took my filled-in form, without even looking at it, and waved me through. I was finally there!

K in Motion Travel Blog. Petty Theft and Pragmatism in Papua New Guinea. Welcome Sign

Petty Theft and Pragmatism in Papua New Guinea – Welcome to Port Moresby

When exiting the airport, a lovely man named Harold stopped me to ask where I was staying. When told, he said it wasn’t safe and offered to find lodging in a safer area. He drove me around in his company’s vehicle, while I presume he should’ve been working. We found a few prohibitively guesthouses run by Christian missionaries. Even more so when you considered what was on offer; a single room with shared bathroom and no WiFi.

As I’d already booked and paid for my accommodation online, I hadn’t brought enough cash to pay the ridiculous prices they were asking. Harold took me to a few more places until we ended up at the Rehoboth Transit House. The owners of this guesthouse were lovely. After I explained the situation, they asked me how much I could pay. Then agreed that I could just pay that amount. I was glad to have that sorted. Now that Harold knew I would be safe, he headed back to work.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Petty Theft and Pragmatism in Papua New Guinea. Guesthouse Cats
Guesthouse Cats

While Harold was driving me around, I had noticed that almost all private properties and some businesses had high perimeter fences topped with barbed wire. The owners of the guesthouse informed me that it wasn’t safe for me to go outside by myself. The explorer in me was devasted. A big part of the way I travel involves wandering around aimlessly until I stumble upon something awesome. The owners did say that either they themselves, or their security guard, were at my disposal whenever I wanted to go out, but still.

Petty Theft and Pragmatism in Papua New Guinea – The Fun Begins

As I’d realised my options for getting around Port Moresby were limited, I had decided to go rural. My destination was the small town of Sogeri, where the Kokoda Trail begins. The security guard from the guesthouse, Sam, accompanied me. We headed to the bus stop across the road from the guesthouse to wait for the bus to Sogeri. As the bus was pulling up, I noticed a teenage boy running from the opposite side of the road. I figured he was just running for the bus. Nope, he was running towards me. Using the distraction of the bus to steal my phone!

Being the fight back kinda person that I am, I decided to chase this little shit as he ran back across the road with my phone. Sam also joined the chase but told me to wait at the road when the boy entered his community. He continued to chase the boy, while I waited. I hoped that he would come back with my phone, at the same time as thinking there was almost no chance of that happening. An elder from the community approached me from a crowd to tell me that he saw the whole thing. He knew the boy and he would get my phone back. At least that was something.

Pragmatic Police

Sam reappeared from the community a short while later, apologising for losing the offender. Would you believe, at that very moment, a police car was passing! We flagged it down. Sam and I relayed the details to the officers, but they said they couldn’t help. I was surprised, considering we were standing right outside the community. As I was about to begrudgingly give up, the elder from the community came over. He told the police that he wanted to help catch the boy. That completely changed the policemen’s demeanour from stoically unhelpful to mildly pleasant.

We were all loaded into the police car for a drive to the boy’s house in the community. Of course, the boy had not gone back there yet, but his brother was there and seemed really pissed off at his brother. Apparently, the boy has done this kinda stuff before and the family was getting sick of it. They felt bad and also wanted to help me get my property back. They asked if I would give them a day to find the boy and return the phone to me, before making an official report to the police. I agreed.

Continuing onto Sogeri

With that kind of sorted, I decided that I may as well continue with my plans. It’s not like there much else I could do at that point. I went back to the guesthouse to get my back-up camera. Every good traveller has one of those! After confirming a few times that I was indeed good to continue, Sam took me back to the bus stop. We were soon on our way to Sogeri. This whole time, Sam had stayed very close to me. That made it all the more surprising he said I could have a wander around by myself in Sogeri. The country areas of Papua New Guinea are deemed to be a lot safer than the capital.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Petty Theft and Pragmatism in Papua New Guinea. Kokoda Trail K in Motion Travel Blog. Petty Theft and Pragmatism in Papua New Guinea. Sogeri Lodge

Meeting the Locals

The bus had dropped us off near a lodge at the start of the Kokoda Trail, which was still a little bit outside of the town. It was there that we met Ranger Muxsie and his friend Robert. Ranger Muxsie then organised us a lift into town with the owners of the lodge. Once we got into town, there was a big volleyball game going on at a school. This school also doubled as the town’s sports ground. There were many makeshift stalls set up along the road outside, selling all kinds of locals foods and fresh juices. All of the stallholders were very friendly and many offered me free samples of their foods and drinks.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Petty Theft and Pragmatism in Papua New Guinea. Monument K in Motion Travel Blog. Petty Theft and Pragmatism in Papua New Guinea. Hiking Trail

Hiking With Locals

Across from the school was a memorial and behind that was a trail that we could hike along. Ranger Muxsie said he would like to guide us, but he had to do some work. He said his friend Robert would accompany us instead. To make sure that we didn’t get lost. As we were walking along, Robert commented about how ‘strong’ I was for being able to keep up a decent pace in the Papua New Guinean heat. I guess other visitors don’t handle it so well but I had the advantage of living in a hot place.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Petty Theft and Pragmatism in Papua New Guinea. Memorial K in Motion Travel Blog. Petty Theft and Pragmatism in Papua New Guinea. Resting with Robert

The trail actually ended up being a dirt road for most of the way. It meandered through memorials for people whose names I can’t pronounce, missionaries and local farming villages. We even had to do a small river crossing, over pipes! It looked like some of the people living in the villages survived by preparing materials for recycling.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Petty Theft and Pragmatism in Papua New Guinea. Kokoda Inititave Sign .K in Motion Travel Blog. Petty Theft and Pragmatism in Papua New Guinea Pipe Crossing

After our little adventure, we returned to the town. Robert left us there and we met back up with Ranger Muxsie. We had to walk a couple of kilometres uphill to get to the pickup point for the bus back to Port Moresby. Muxsie had decided to join us for the walk. While waiting for the bus, we all exchanged contact details. Muxsie said I should call him, so he could take care of me, if I’m ever back in the area.

K in Motion Travel Blog. Petty Theft and Pragmatism in Papua New Guinea. Sam, Robert and I